Things Employers Aren’t Allowed to Ask You

Jason Morris

Yahoo! Finance had a great article this morning on things an employer can’t ask a candidate.  These things range from your age to your marital status.  This topic plays well into the presentation I have been doing all across the United States about recruiting and Web 2.0.  Just looking at someones facebook and/or LinkedIn page could put you and your company in peril.  (Shameless plug, for my next speaking engagements click here!) We are working hard to make sure employers are not barred from asking about past criminal history, however, many states and the EEOC would like to see things differently.  These things don’t change the fact that we are in a tough economy, people need to work.  Because of these desperate times, candidates sometimes take desperate measures…..They Lie!  Employers can still comply with the EEOC, ADEA, ADA, OFCCP, Order 11246, ETC, etc, etc….and still find quality candidates that tell the truth. How you ask?  Read the thousands of articles, white papers and positions statements we have written on our Blog and University.

According to Yahoo!

The rough economy has made many people desperate for a job. In their eagerness for gainful employment, many people may overlook improper interview questions. Depending on how they are asked, questions about personal topics such as marital status, race and health are more than just poor manners – they are illegal under federal and some state and local laws. These types of questions can be used to discriminate against applicants, and it is your right not to answer them. Here are eight questions your employer cannot ask you.

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Jason Morris

President & Chief Operating Officer at EmployeeScreenIQ
A veteran screening and risk management professional, Jason Morris founded EmployeeScreenIQ in 1999 and acts as the company’s chief operating officer and president. Morris is a frequent speaker delivering captivating, interactive discussions on background checks, global screening, recruitment and staffing. He educates audiences in best practice initiatives as they relate to organizational employment screening programs. Morris has been quoted in numerous business and industry publications including The Wall Street Journal, MSNBC.com, USA Today, New York Times, among others. He is also a licensed private investigator in the states of Ohio, Illinois, New Jersey, Texas, Arizona and Nevada.
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