Great Article Found on ERE About Value of Resumes

Nick Fishman

ERE published a great article written by Sue Danborn from Volt Workforce Solutions about the diminishing value of a resume entitled The Devalued Currency of Hiring: The Resume. I of course dwelled on the part about employers not knowing what is true, what is stretched truth and what is fabricated. At employeescreenIQ, we find a 56% discrepancy ratio between what an applicant reports and what past employers or educational institutions indicate about that applicant when asked.

I’m certainly not anti-resume, but it is important that those who review them take them with a grain of salt and confirm the details that are provided. Check out Sue’s list of 5 Things a Resume Will Not Tell You:

  • Is the candidate being truthful? A Society for Human Resource Management study of 2.6 million applicants in 2003 found that 53% of their resumes contained omissions or misrepresentations. Bogus degrees and certifications, length of employment, and levels of positions held are all areas that are commonly embellished. Since a resume is not signed like an application, many candidates feel they are just stretching the truth and not breaking the law by doing this. Several states have put through legislation to punish candidates who misrepresent themselves in writing when seeking employment.
  • Is the candidate motivated to do this job? Yes, the candidate is unquestionably qualified, but he simply doesn’t want to do the work. The candidate is seeking a new challenge.
  • Is the candidate driven to excel? Many candidates neglect to list their accomplishments on a resume. They detail every employer, task, and duty they’ve performed. Either because of humility or lack of knowledge, they neglect to include how their efforts benefited their employers. What did they really accomplish? They can deliver the minimum expectations, but will they excel? Is this the best candidate for the position, or is it just a convenient fill?
  • Does the candidate have good communication skills? Did he write his own resume or buy it? Does he have good, natural, or learned communication skills or did someone coach him through producing this resume (and will that coach hopefully be accompanying the candidate to the job daily)?
  • Will the candidate fit the culture? It’s almost impossible to gauge from a resume whether a candidate will be a good fit culturally for the company and the department. In some cases, the cultural fit may be more important than the skill match. bout
Nick Fishman
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Nick Fishman

Nick Fishman is the co-founder of EmployeeScreenIQ, a leading, global employment background screening provider, and serves as the company’s executive vice president and chief marketing officer. He pioneered the creation of EmployeeScreen University, the #1 educational resource on employment background checks for human resources, security and risk management professionals. A recognized industry expert, Nick is a frequent author, presenter and contributor to the news media. Nick is also a licensed private investigator in the states of Ohio and Texas.
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