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Government Study on Background Checks Addresses Incomplete FBI Criminal Records

Angela Preston

Missing Data

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has been busy. At the request of Congress, it’s been looking into criminal background checks. Last week the GAO released a report of findings from a two year study titled “CRIMINAL HISTORY RECORDS: Additional Actions Could Enhance the Completeness of Records Used for Employment-Related Background Checks.” The report lives up to that lengthy title–it is the most comprehensive accounting of the current state of FBI background checks, criminal record databases, and practices since 2006. It reveals when and why states conduct FBI record checks, and looks at whether states have improved upon reporting complete records into the FBI database. It also looks at the practices of private companies that conduct criminal record checks.

Congress has good reason to be concerned. Every year, more state and federal agencies are turning to statewide databases and the FBI records to screen employees for safety and security reasons. The number one concern is this: incomplete records.

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3 Background Screening Practices to Prevent Casino Employee Theft

Alex Krokos

Casino employee theft

Is your business being sabotaged by its own employees?

For many employers in the gaming industry, the answer to this question may be a surprising one. Research shows that almost half of all losses in casinos is due to employee theft. In casinos, theft can happen in many different places, from the cashier cage to the vault rooms to the casino floor.

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Is Ban the Box Legislation Out of Control?

Nick Fishman

BTB

It’s no secret that ban the box legislation is on the rise in cities, counties, and states across the United States. Just in case you haven’t heard much about this movement yet, here’s a brief explanation. When a particular location “bans the box” this means that employers are unable to include the check box on applications which asks whether or not an applicant has been convicted of a crime—at least not until later in the hiring process.

While these laws are well-intentioned, they’ve often become confusing for employers. While they protect job candidates from discrimination, laws are inconsistent, which exposes employers to an increased risk of breaking the law if they are unaware of the facts. (more…)

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