IQ Blog

Dylann Roof’s Background Check: Quality Takes Time

Angela Preston

Criminal Background Check

It’s a heartbreaking story. Every time a shooter like the alleged killer Dylann Roof becomes unhinged and takes innocent lives, we, as a nation, mourn. What makes the story even worse is to think that it all might have been prevented by taking more time with the background check.

Roof is accused of killing nine people at a church in South Carolina three weeks ago. Last Friday, FBI Director James B. Comey said Roof was able to purchase the gun used in the attack only because of lapses in the FBI’s background-check system. In a statement last week, Comey said “This case rips all of our hearts out. But the thought that an error on our part is connected to this guy’s purchase of a gun that he used to slaughter these good people is very painful to us.”

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Oregon Bans the Box

Angela Preston

Oregon Ban The Box

Oregon has officially banned the box for all employers, delaying the timing of pre-employment criminal background checks. On June 25, Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed HB 3025 into law. Effective January 1, 2016, it will be illegal for an employer in the State of Oregon to require an applicant to disclose a criminal conviction on a job application or to require an applicant to disclose, prior to an initial interview, a criminal conviction.  If no interview is conducted, it will be illegal to require an applicant to disclose, prior to making a conditional offer of employment, a criminal conviction.

The statute specifies that it does not make it illegal to perform a criminal background check or to consider conviction history in the hiring process.  It does, however, defer an inquiry into criminal history until after the applicant has been interviewed or potentially offered the position.

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The State of Marijuana

Alex Krokos

 

With the marijuana legalization trend showing no signs of slowing, many employers are finding themselves in a position where they don’t know how to respond to the new laws. Today, 23 states and Washington D.C., have legalized marijuana in some form, with Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, Washington and Washington D.C. legalizing recreational use. 25 million Americans have admitted to using marijuana in the past year, while 14 million said they use marijuana regularly.

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