EmployeeScreenIQ Weekly Wrap Up-November 12, 2012

Nick Fishman

Happy Monday!  A little late, but here is our weekly wrap up for last week. Friday brought to light provocative information regarding the background screening industry with NBC’s Today Show criticism of  background screening companies. The story came out at the end of last week, so you may have missed out on Angela Bosworth’s blog in response to this story. We also covered the increasing rate of employee fraud in the workplace, and as this week is International Fraud Awareness Week, it’s a great opportunity to think about the frequency of employee fraud and tips on how to prevent fraud in your company. Last week also revealed that the FCRA is not unconstitutional, as one court in Pennsylvania proposed—find out how this issue relates to employee background checks. Thursday was also an exciting day in the ESIQ office. We brought in a film crew for the day and turned our office into a set for an upcoming project for education on important topics in the background screening industry. Check out some photos from filming on our company Facebook pageKeep a lookout for the release of this video series!

Top Stories:

Background Checks Scrutinized by NBC’s Today

This morning, the Today show ran an investigative piece criticizing background screening companies. The story gave several examples of egregious mistakes made by some well-known background screening companies. I knew that the story was coming, and I fully anticipated a one-sided hatchet job portraying background screening companies in the worst possible light. (See More)

 

Increasing Rate of Employee Fraud in the Workplace

In case you’re not in the know, next week (November 11th-17th) is International Fraud Awareness Week 2012. The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners sponsors this awareness week and encourages companies to become more educated in the hazards of fraud in the workplace. (See More)

 

 

Pennsylvania District Court: FCRA is not Unconstitutional

The Eastern District of Pennsylvania has ruled that Section 1681c of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is not an unconstitutional restriction of free speech. The defendant in the case, a consumer reporting agency conducting background checks, argued that this section of the FCRA was an unconstitutional restriction on free speech. (See More)

 

 

 

Look out for more industry news this week in our IQ blog!

 

 

Nick Fishman
Follow Me

Nick Fishman

Nick Fishman is the co-founder of EmployeeScreenIQ, a leading, global employment background screening provider, and serves as the company’s executive vice president and chief marketing officer. He pioneered the creation of EmployeeScreen University, the #1 educational resource on employment background checks for human resources, security and risk management professionals. A recognized industry expert, Nick is a frequent author, presenter and contributor to the news media. Nick is also a licensed private investigator in the states of Ohio and Texas.
Nick Fishman
Follow Me
Tweet
Share
Email
Share