Teachers in Trouble Slip Through Cracks

Jason Morris

INDIANAPOLIS – Indiana teachers who run afoul of the law won’t necessarily get into any trouble over their licenses because the state’s system of reporting and background checks lags those in other states, a newspaper study found.

Unlike other states, Indiana doesn’t require schools and police to report most teacher misconduct to state education officials, The Indianapolis Star reported Sunday.

Instead, prosecutors and school superintendents are required to report only if teachers are convicted of certain felonies: kidnapping, dealing drugs or sex crimes against children. Arrests or investigations even for these crimes — and convictions for lesser ones — can fall below the state’s radar.

“Ideally we would want to be notified anytime anybody holding a teacher license gets arrested,” said Kevin McDowell, general counsel for the Indiana Department of Education. “Some states do that.”

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Jason Morris

President & Chief Operating Officer at EmployeeScreenIQ
A veteran screening and risk management professional, Jason Morris founded EmployeeScreenIQ in 1999 and acts as the company’s chief operating officer and president. Morris is a frequent speaker delivering captivating, interactive discussions on background checks, global screening, recruitment and staffing. He educates audiences in best practice initiatives as they relate to organizational employment screening programs. Morris has been quoted in numerous business and industry publications including The Wall Street Journal, MSNBC.com, USA Today, New York Times, among others. He is also a licensed private investigator in the states of Ohio, Illinois, New Jersey, Texas, Arizona and Nevada.
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