Searches of Old Criminal Records End School Jobs

Jason Morris

A new law requiring more background checks on Ohio teachers and school employees is finding a lot of adverse information.  No one ever wants to see someone lose their job, especially after so many years of gainful employment.  However, this is for a greater good, protecting our children.

Searches of Old Criminal Records End School Jobs

Sweeping changes in state laws intended to keep students safe have uncovered criminal offenses — some decades old — that are costing school employees their jobs.

The impact has been especially evident among nonteaching employees who, until this year, did not have to undergo the kind of comprehensive background checks done for teachers.

Now, staffers such as custodians, secretaries and cafeteria workers may face dismissal for newly unearthed offenses committed years ago.

John Reccord, a night supervisor for the Orange school district, has worked there for nearly two decades. But he stands to lose his job for an offense to which he pleaded guilty 35 years ago and was sentenced to probation.

“I have been at the school for 19 years without any problems,” Reccord said. “This is going to affect people who did something when they were young. Why should they lose their jobs now?”

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Jason Morris

President & Chief Operating Officer at EmployeeScreenIQ
A veteran screening and risk management professional, Jason Morris founded EmployeeScreenIQ in 1999 and acts as the company’s chief operating officer and president. Morris is a frequent speaker delivering captivating, interactive discussions on background checks, global screening, recruitment and staffing. He educates audiences in best practice initiatives as they relate to organizational employment screening programs. Morris has been quoted in numerous business and industry publications including The Wall Street Journal, MSNBC.com, USA Today, New York Times, among others. He is also a licensed private investigator in the states of Ohio, Illinois, New Jersey, Texas, Arizona and Nevada.
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