How School Districts Check Applicants’ Past

Jason Morris

Henry School Superintendent Brian Sieh has been in trouble with the law before his domestic assault charge. Sieh has a lengthy record of traffic violations, including tickets for open container.

Sieh pleaded guilty to eleven speeding tickets and two open container violations between 1995 and 2008. But even such traffic violations aren’t necessarily deal breakers for landing a job as a school superintendent.

South Dakota law requires the state to conduct a criminal background check on anyone applying for a job with a school district.

“People in the state can feel confident that people employed in the school districts have gone through a thorough criminal background check,” Brian Aust of Associated School Boards of South Dakota said.

School boards cannot hire anyone with a history of violent crimes, like the assault charge Sieh is accused of. Sexual assaults and drug convictions are also major red flags. But districts have more leeway when it comes to hiring someone with traffic tickets.

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Jason Morris

President & Chief Operating Officer at EmployeeScreenIQ
A veteran screening and risk management professional, Jason Morris founded EmployeeScreenIQ in 1999 and acts as the company’s chief operating officer and president. Morris is a frequent speaker delivering captivating, interactive discussions on background checks, global screening, recruitment and staffing. He educates audiences in best practice initiatives as they relate to organizational employment screening programs. Morris has been quoted in numerous business and industry publications including The Wall Street Journal, MSNBC.com, USA Today, New York Times, among others. He is also a licensed private investigator in the states of Ohio, Illinois, New Jersey, Texas, Arizona and Nevada.
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