Hospital: Check Didn’t Show Past Charges Against Suspect

Jason Morris

The murder charges against a Suburban Hospital employee who police say killed his boss over workplace disputes have raised questions about how a man with a violent past slipped through the background checks the hospital says it routinely employs.

Suburban spokeswoman Ronna Borenstein-Levy said the hospital conducted a background check on 49-year-old engineer Keith D. Little — accused of stabbing his supervisor, Roosevelt Brockington Jr., more than 70 times in Suburban’s boiler room — but that check “did not return information on prior arrests and convictions.”

But court records show Little was charged with second-degree murder in a 2003 D.C. slaying but was found not guilty in a jury trial. He also served about six years in prison after he was convicted of several assault charges and obstruction of justice related to a 1984 attack.

Borenstein-Levy said police and prosecutors have told the hospital that cases that result in an acquittal or successful appeal often do not appear on background checks.

She would not elaborate on Suburban’s procedures for conducting background checks.

The hospital also asks employees to self-disclose past criminal convictions and pending charges, according to its online application. The application says that a criminal record “will not necessarily bar you from employment.” It says the hospital considers factors that include the person’s age at the time of the conviction, how much time has passed since then, the nature of the offense and rehabilitation.

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Jason Morris

President & Chief Operating Officer at EmployeeScreenIQ
A veteran screening and risk management professional, Jason Morris founded EmployeeScreenIQ in 1999 and acts as the company’s chief operating officer and president. Morris is a frequent speaker delivering captivating, interactive discussions on background checks, global screening, recruitment and staffing. He educates audiences in best practice initiatives as they relate to organizational employment screening programs. Morris has been quoted in numerous business and industry publications including The Wall Street Journal, MSNBC.com, USA Today, New York Times, among others. He is also a licensed private investigator in the states of Ohio, Illinois, New Jersey, Texas, Arizona and Nevada.
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