What does the “No Fly List” have in common with your background checks?

Kevin Bachman

The TSA recently announced new requirements for flyers. It is aimed at reducing the number of passengers inadvertently delayed or unable to fly just because their name is the same as someone on the list. Name, date of birth, gender, etc. will be collected by airlines and submitted to the TSA. This will speed up the process and ideally limit the number of people incorrectly stopped.

But how does this compare to your criminal records check? Faithful readers of our blog, newsletter, or podcast listeners know we often talk about identifiers and obligations to ensure the information we share is accurate and up to date. State and federal law, not to mention good ethics and overall business sense, demand it.

So how do we do it? We compare these identifiers to information on file in the courthouse. When we find a criminal record for John Smith, we use the date of birth, the SSN, the Driver’s License, etc., to confirm if it’s the John Smith you’re hiring to be your next latex salesman. Just like the TSA. Similar processes and safeguards designed to serve the same purpose. More information ensures accuracy and reduces risk.

How do we think this will be perceived? Privacy advocates, likely unhappy. More information collected and stored in databases. Security advocates, probably happy. Families traveling with small children anticipating a shorter security line? Definitely happy.  

Kevin Bachman
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Kevin Bachman

Senior Vice President of Operations at EmployeeScreenIQ
Kevin is responsible for creating strategy and setting long term goals to manage and optimize organizational workflow. Kevin ensures the company exceeds performance benchmarks by designing and implementing a robust set of analytics and metrics. As a member of the executive committee, he helps shape corporate strategy and sets the direction of key client initiatives. With 13 years industry experience, Kevin is a member of the National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS), previously serving on the best practices committee and co-chairing the Litigation Avoidance sub-committee.
Kevin Bachman
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