Safeguarding Ohio Children

Jason Morris

It isn’t realistic to expect that anyone who may come into contact with children could be – or should be – subjected to background checks. But those working in certain jobs should be checked to avoid placing youngsters in contact with those who have criminal records of offenses against children.

Ohio law requires some background checks but doesn’t enforce the rules well, if at all, an investigation by The Columbus Dispatch revealed. And background check laws sometimes defy logic.

Operators of day camps for children are required to provide the state with background information on employees. But The Dispatch found that at least one-third of the camps in Ohio have not completed employee background checks. No system of collecting fines from camp operators who do not comply has been devised.

But The Dispatch uncovered an even more serious gap in the law. It seems that operators of camps where children stay overnight are not required to submit background check information on their employees.

That’s absurd – and it makes one wonder what other dangerous lapses occurred in writing and approving background check laws.

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Jason Morris

President & Chief Operating Officer at EmployeeScreenIQ
A veteran screening and risk management professional, Jason Morris founded EmployeeScreenIQ in 1999 and acts as the company’s chief operating officer and president. Morris is a frequent speaker delivering captivating, interactive discussions on background checks, global screening, recruitment and staffing. He educates audiences in best practice initiatives as they relate to organizational employment screening programs. Morris has been quoted in numerous business and industry publications including The Wall Street Journal, MSNBC.com, USA Today, New York Times, among others. He is also a licensed private investigator in the states of Ohio, Illinois, New Jersey, Texas, Arizona and Nevada.
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