BTW- Should Employers Ask for Social Media Passwords?

Nick Fishman

Consumer Privacy Employment Background Checks

For those of you interested in keeping up with the latest in pre-employment background screening compliance and the laws that affect your use of  employee background checks, check out our latest publication, BTW: Your Guide to Staying Out of Hot Water.  This compliance resource has been crafted by our VP of Compliance and General Counsel, Angela Preston and is a must-read for human resources and security professionals.

Our March issue focuses on issues of consumer privacy particularly as it relates to employers request of their candidates’ social media passwords.  While we don’t believe many employers engage in this practice as part of their employment background check policies, congress seems poised to create a federal law banning such a request.  We also take a close look at a recent $3 million FCRA settlement and the trend of local/state governments adopting “Ban the Box” measures.  For a preview of this issue, check out Angela’s video below.

 

 

Review March Issue

 

 

Nick Fishman
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Nick Fishman

Nick Fishman is the co-founder of EmployeeScreenIQ, a leading, global employment background screening provider, and serves as the company’s executive vice president and chief marketing officer. He pioneered the creation of EmployeeScreen University, the #1 educational resource on employment background checks for human resources, security and risk management professionals. A recognized industry expert, Nick is a frequent author, presenter and contributor to the news media. Nick is also a licensed private investigator in the states of Ohio and Texas.
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  • http://www.HRjungle.com C.J. Westrick

    California enacted a law this year making it illegal for CA employers to ask for employee or applicant user names and passwords. It also prevents supervisors from asking to connect with employees/applicants on social media and prohibits many other things considered an invasion of the employee’s privacy.

  • Name Lynn MacKenzie

    I don’t agree with the idea and/or practice of asking employees/applicants for their personal social media passwords and expected laws to be enacted to prevent this. I believe employees should be able to maintain some sense of privacy in their life outside work. If we allow employers and/or prospective employers to start asking for personal passwords, what would be next? A home visit? Hiring a P.I. to look further into the lives of employees?
    If this becomes the trend for the future, I see it as going backwards – almost to the days when a male applicant for a position had to bring his wife in to meet his prospective employer.
    As a Human Resources professional, I strongly believe there needs to be some line between an employee’s personal life and his/her professional life. What people post or say on social media may give some insight as to the character and integrity of the person, but there are more appropriate ways to determine that without invading privacy.