Background Checks May Not Be the Myers-Briggs Test—4 Reasons They’re Better

Nick Fishman

Employment Background Checks

Surely you’ve heard of the Myers-Briggs test—an assessment that categorizes people into 16 different personality types, the results supposedly able to determine the types of jobs that would be best for you. However, a recent article reveals this test may not be as telling as many employers—and others, once believed and reports, “Analysis shows the test is totally ineffective at predicting people’s success at various jobs.” And yet, many companies continue to spend money on this test and trust in its ability to reveal a person’s personality and behavior.

For employers seeking that “perfect” candidate, it’s possible you’re looking for some way to screen candidates in order to ensure they are a good fit for your company. Oddly enough, because of our company name, EmployeeScreenIQ often receives inquiries about personality or psychological screening for job candidates—FYI we do not offer this service.

However, I would like to put this on the table—that employment background checks could be a better indicator of job fit than any sort of psychological screening. For one, employment background checks offer hard facts about a person—their past experience and qualifications according to previous employers, opposed to a test with results that could differ each time you take it.

4 Reasons a Background Check is Better Than Myers-Briggs

1. Verify the Facts

Unlike a Myers-Briggs test, which claims to be indicative of behavior, a background check will verify the facts—like a candidate’s experience with a past employer. There’s no guesswork here, background check results will provide you with the answers you need to make better hiring decisions.

2. Dig Up a Criminal Past

While employers should not allow the presence of a criminal record to necessarily disqualify a candidate from a position, there are positions in which it would be detrimental for others if someone with a record worked in that position, i.e. a sex offender working with children, a former drug dealer working as a drug abuse counselor, etc.

3. Hear from Past Employers

While we don’t always recommend references to clients, this service has the potential to tell an employer more than they would learn from a personality test or basic employment verification. By asking a set of questions about a candidate’s strengths and weaknesses, a good reference will provide answers that could assist an employer with the hiring decision—either by learning the candidate’s skills and experience or through hearing about their character in a professional and/or personal environment.

4. Are They Clean?

In many positions, employers want to guarantee that a candidate is not involved in anything illegal, right? A criminal background check will cover the past, but what about the present? Many employers request that job candidates take a substance abuse screening test to ensure they are healthy and there won’t be any issues in the future due to drug abuse. And as far as I know, I don’t think Myers-Briggs can do that.

Want to learn more about the benefits of a comprehensive employment background check? Download No Shortcuts: Smarter Screening with EmployeeScreenIQ:




 

Nick Fishman
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Nick Fishman

Nick Fishman is the co-founder of EmployeeScreenIQ, a leading, global employment background screening provider, and serves as the company’s executive vice president and chief marketing officer. He pioneered the creation of EmployeeScreen University, the #1 educational resource on employment background checks for human resources, security and risk management professionals. A recognized industry expert, Nick is a frequent author, presenter and contributor to the news media. Nick is also a licensed private investigator in the states of Ohio and Texas.
Nick Fishman
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