Please select a service to learn more:

Identity and Credit

Driver's Records

Criminal Records

References/Credentialing

Substance Abuse/Physicals

Global Solutions

Applicant Tracking

Solutions by Industry

Personal Background Checks

0

With a new year just around the corner, there’s no better way to move forward than to reflect on the events, challenges, and growth of the past year. Particularly for the background screening industry and HR professionals, it’s essential to learn from these stories to prepare for the challenges ahead in 2014. Some of our top stories include the misuse of employment background checks, the ban the box movement, and screening candidates on social media. Keep the lessons in these stories under consideration as you move forward with your background screening program in 2014.

EmployeeScreenIQ's Top Background Screening Stories 2013

1. EEOC Targets Dollar General and BMW for Criminal Background Checks

The EEOC continued its crusade to fight discrimination by way of litigation against Dollar General and BMW. Take a closer look at the claims and what employers need to know. Read More

2. Texas Takes on the EEOC: The Case You’ve Been Waiting For

Texas is took on the EEOC claiming that the latest guidelines unlawfully limit the ability of employers to exclude convicted felons from employment. Read More

3. Cha-Ching! K-Mart to Pay $3 Million to Settle Background Check Claims

Charged with background screening violations in relation to adverse action notifications, employers need to be increasingly aware of compliance risks in 2014. Read More

[...]

Continue Reading

4

California

A background check is a background check, right? Regardless of city or state? One could argue, yes, aside from a few variations, the basics are the same from one location to another. However, due to the fact that there are both State and Federal screening laws, employers must comply with both sets of laws when conducting employment background checks. Specifically, several states have laws and considerations for background checks, and employers should be aware of these.

One example is the state of California, where there are some unique laws and guidelines that employers should know in relation to background screening.

[...]

Continue Reading

0

As July is quietly coming to a close, it seems we are due for another Weekly Wrap Up. We’ve posted quite a bit in the past couple weeks, so here’s a recap for those who have been busy vacationing or were otherwise preoccupied. We officially released another video from our Quick Takes series, Is a Candidate’s Profile Picture Worth a Thousand Words? This video focuses on the use of social media screening in the hiring process. Find out what our panelists had to say about using this important tool for job candidates. At the end of last week, I shared a blog post regarding the use of resume verifications and advice for employers to ensure you find resume lies, when they are present on a job application. For more, read Liar, Liar. Are Job Seekers Hiring Professional Liars to Verify Resumes? Nick posted a useful guide to the top 10 advocates in our industry (as far as we’re aware), EmployeeScreenIQ’s List of Top 10 Employment Background Screening Advocates. Miss anything else? View our full blog site for more posts from your very own background screening experts.

 

EmployeeScreenIQ’s List of Top 10

Employment Background Screening AdvocatesTop 10 Employment Background Screening Advocates

It’s no secret that the employment background screening industry has been under intense scrutiny over the past few years from revised EEOC guidance on employers’ use of criminal records, to fines for Fair Credit Reporting Act violations, to myriad states creation of “Ban the Box” laws. And while we support actions that hold our industry and employers accountable for complying with these laws and maintaining the highest ethical standards, we also think that the employer’s we represent should be praised for the work they do to keep our nation’s workplaces safe. Read More

 

 

 

Liar, Liar. Are Job Seekers Hiring

Professional Liars to Verify Resumes?Resume Verifications

As an employer, you may expect a few lies in the hundreds (or more) resumes you receive. These discrepancies may or may not be intentional — a forgotten end date of employment or job title is average to find on almost any resume. However, you might not expect for applicants to both blatantly lie on their resume and ensure that their lie is verified. It seems like a lot of work for someone who just wants a job offer. Or is it? Read More

 

 

 

Is a Candidate’s Profile Picture

Worth a Thousand Words?Social Media Background Checks

Today’s employers are faced with a growing dilemma: whether or not to use social media to screen job candidates. The information you find on someone’s social media profile has the potential to make a profound impact on your hiring decision-whether it’s negative or positive. If you’re like many employers, you might be conflicted on whether to use these tools for background screening purposes. Angela, Nick and Jason discuss the potential risks and legal ramifications of social media screening. Read More

 

 

 

 

 

Continue Reading

1

Resume Verifications

As an employer, you may expect a few lies in the hundreds (or more) resumes you receive. These discrepancies may or may not be intentional — a forgotten end date of employment or job title is average to find on almost any resume. However, you might not expect for applicants to both blatantly lie on their resume and ensure that their lie is verified. It seems like a lot of work for someone who just wants a job offer. Or is it?

As an employer, you most likely verify resumes through a third party–a background screening company, or perhaps you verify this information yourself. Regardless, you hope that one of these methods would uncover any discrepancies on a candidate’s resume. It’s standard to verify education, recent employers and perhaps request a reference or two before offering someone a position. The question is, how can you know how accurate these verifications are?

It may (or may not) be shocking that there are companies and websites with the sole aim of deceiving employers, while helping job seekers-for a price of course. An article posted on CNN Money, details the “business” of Timothy Green, who claims to run a company that will to lie anyone, about anything (however, if you read the terms on their website, that’s not entirely true). You can read the article for more information, but knowing the premise of this company, how can an employer or company feel safe with their hiring decisions?

[...]

Continue Reading

1

  

One of my favorite all-time posts is the story we wrote about Chester Ludlow who was awarded a diploma from Rochville University in 2009.  What made it so great?  Chester Ludlow is a dog and Rochville University is a diploma mill used by those without real degrees to pull the wool over unsuspecting hiring managers’ eyes when they conduct employment background checks.  Now, Chester wasn’t really looking to fool anyone.  His owner thought it would be funny to expose this fake university.

Unfortunately, the new diving coach at Indiana University was not so pure of heart when he applied for his position.  Apparently, IU was not fooled by Drew Johansen’s “white lie” and decided to hire him anyway. [...]

Continue Reading

0

Over two years ago we blogged about the case of an employee involved in workplace violence at The Ohio State University. The OSU employee shot and killed one person and wounded another resulting in a flurry of questions about why the background check did not reveal that this man had a criminal record. It turned out that the employee had intentionally given an incorrect date of birth so that his past record would not be discovered. The moral of the story was that date of birth is vitally important when it comes to a background check and without it, mistakes like this can occur even if a background screening company does everything right. Without the correct date of birth, the background screening company that performed his background check was unable to find his criminal record.

[...]

Continue Reading

0

 

Things are quickly winding down for the year at EmployeeScreenIQ, and we’re excited (much like Ralphie from A Christmas Story) for what’s to come in 2013. We’ve had quite a few blog posts this week that you might have missed in the hustle and bustle of the end of the month and the end of the year. Something I would like to highlight in particular is that our Employment Background Screening Trends Survey is awaiting your participation (and even better, we’ve extended the deadline through January)! As proven in 2011, our survey is a great resource for us and others in our industry. I’m not even sure where to begin wrapping up this last week because there are an overabundance of exciting stories on our blog.  I recommend taking a ten minute break from your work and scroll down our blog page. Some of the stories from this past week include, Recruiting On Social Networks: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of 2012, an important update with ban the box in Pittsburgh and the results of a CareerBuilder survey showcasing the costliness of bad hires. Thanks for reading throughout this year and happy holidays!

 

Recruiting On Social Networks: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of 2012

Social MediaSocial recruiting has seemingly moved up on HR’s list of priorities when it comes to hiring-and not only seeking job candidates via Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, but also searching profiles for reasons to remove a candidate from the process. If a potential employee has a public profile, HR can easily scan their page. However, this becomes a problem if employers are requesting user names and passwords to look at a candidate’s private profile. See More

[...]

Continue Reading

1

images[4]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve encountered countless stories of job applicants lying on their resume, whether it’s been education or employment, somehow these tricksters have gained employment or even entered Ivy League schools based on resume lies. Several months ago the news was buzzing with the story of the Yahoo CEO, Scott Thompson who deceivingly listed that he earned a degree in accounting and computer science. The latter degree claim was a lie. Earlier this year it was discovered that the CEO had only received a degree in accounting from Stonehill College and built his career based on this lie.

Another fascinating fabrication from 2010 was the story of Adam Wheeler, who elaborately created a resume not with little white lies, but blatant claims of attending schools he never did and earning test scores he never received. Wheeler was admitted into Harvard and even attended until his lies were uncovered.

It’s troubling that if Thompson and Wheeler got away with lies like these, there are definitely employees that are slipping through the cracks all the time. Whether it’s a huge lie like these two or something smaller, it’s disconcerting that either these companies are not completing employment background checks or these background checks are not being done thoroughly.

A recent Careerbuilder survey revealed intriguing statistics from employers saying they’ve made costly hiring mistakes in the past year.  [...]

Continue Reading

0

Resume Lie story

 

 

 

 

 

 

EmployeeScreenIQ finds a 52% discrepancy rate between the information an applicant claims on their resume and the information we verify with employers and academic institutions. While over half of these resumes have some sort of discrepancy, the problem could be as minor as an incorrect date of employment or as major as the applicant claiming a degree they did not receive. This was the case of Jordan Miller, former Director of Social Media at University of Michigan, who claimed she had a degree in Journalism from Columbia. It was recently revealed that Miller never received the degree.

[...]

Continue Reading

0

 

 

 

 

 

There are new cases of employees failing to disclose information on job applications every day.  This particular story as reported by News Channel 5, hits close to home as EmployeeScreenIQ is located in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. The two employees, Patrick J. Gallagher, Grounds/Maintenance Worker, and Michael J. Gallagher, Safety & Health Coordinator, provided misleading information on their job applications-one did not disclose his criminal history in full, and the other listed false education information.

However, while there was a failure for the two employees to provide this information, one must also question if background checks were completed, and if so, how thorough were the background checks if this information was discovered years later? An eight page report was provided on the News Channel 5 website which includes the details of this story, but it does not detail if there was a previous investigation or background check completed, prior to these allegations. The allegations were:

  • Patrick failed to disclose his criminal history on his application for a position with Cuyahoga County.
  • Michael falsified his original application as well as an application for promotion with the information that he earned an Associate’s degree from Cuyahoga Community College.

[...]

Continue Reading

All information contained on this website is provided by employeescreenIQ solely for the convenience of the site viewers. employeescreenIQ is not providing legal advice or counsel and nothing provided on this website or otherwise by employeescreenIQ should be deemed as legal guidance or advice. Users are solely responsible for complying with all local, state, and federal laws relating to the use of any information provided on this website and any information products provided by employeescreenIQ. Users should consult with their own legal counsel if they have questions regarding their legal responsibilities or any information provided by employeescreenIQ.