Free Webinar: Your Applicants Have Something to Hide. Why You’re Not Finding It.

A school teacher is accused of striking a child. The background check had reported no record of criminal activity; however, a school investigation following the incident reveals that the teacher had a pending assault and battery case..

Sadly, background check horror stories are more common than you think. Don’t let it happen to you!

No Shortcuts
Your Applicants Have Something to Hide: Why You’re Not Finding It.
Date: Thursday, November 17, 2011
Time: 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EDT
Cost: FREE
Register here: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/681781352

Drawing from 13 years of experience, EmployeeScreenIQ’s webinar will explain how to ensure accurate criminal background checks. You’ll also learn:

  • Why taking “shortcuts” can lead to compromised background checks
  • How companies can inadvertently hire violent criminals
  • How to maintain a positive candidate experience, even if negative results are revealed

Download the Whitepaper now!

Partner Profile: Integrate Your Background Screening Program with iCIMS’

As a proud partner of EmployeeScreenIQ iCIMS offers software solutions to track and automate everything talent management. We understand that using different systems to manage your pre-hire processes can make identifying top talent difficult as well as create more manual work and reduce overall ROI.

Integrate your background screening program with the iCIMS Talent Platform to enhance your talent pipeline, team productivity, and bottom line. iCIMS offers solutions that bring together pre-hire processes with easy-to-use software that also integrates with third-party systems like your HRIS and assessment data providers as well as EmployeeScreenIQ!.

Employers spend a lot of time, money and effort identifying the perfect candidate. A background screening provider shouldn’t jeopardize that hard work!

Learn More

Looking to Develop a Crime-Free Work Place? Try the National Football League

So here’s something that will shock you. Did you know that average National Football League player is less likely to be arrested than your average Joe? WCCO, the CBS affiliate in Minneapolis has the stats to prove it.

The numbers don’t lie. One in every 45 National Football League players (2.2 percent) is arrested. The national arrest rate is 1 in 23 (4.2 percent), according to the FBI in 2010.

What does that mean? Technically, NFL players get in 47.6 percent less trouble than your average Joe.

When Mike the butcher gets a DUI, it’s not news. But when Steve the cornerback gets busted for public intoxication, it becomes a story.

WCCO Minnesota’s Jason DeRusha reports that in 2010, the NBA had by far the highest arrest rate (5.1 percent) of the major professional sports leagues in America. Major League Baseball is second with an arrest rate of 2.1 percent last year. Believe it or not, the NFL is last with (2.0 percent) of its players in trouble.

Each NBA team can have a maximum of 15 players on its roster, with 12 dressing for each game. With 30 teams, that equates to 450 players. Only 23 were arrested in 2010.

NFL teams are allowed 53 players on their rosters (plus five man practice squad). With 32 teams, that calculates to a total of 1,696 players. The League saw only 34 players arrested a year ago.

In Major League Baseball, there are 750 players — 30 teams with 25 players each. That doesn’t include the 40-man roster, which if included, would up the total players to 1,200. Sixteen baseball players were arrested for major drug and violent crimes in 2010.

Now unfortunately for the Minnesota Vikings, the stats don’t fare so well.  Since 2000, 1 out of every 15 players has gotten arrested.  Yikes!  Check out WCCO’s video below.

 

Are You Ready to Get a Life?

One of great pleasures I have enjoyed since we started in 1999 is to watch how our company has grown and how we have evolved as a result of that growth.  If you would have asked me about an employment brand back them, I’d have no idea what you were talking about.  Fast forward to 2011, and I am proud to unveil our first efforts to do so.

Why?  Well, we have positions to fill.  And as we mention above, we’re growing, growing, growing.  So, whether you are client or a future EmployeeScreenIQ team member, take note that we are competing for top talent. Check out some of the highlights of our brand below and visit our careers page for more information (videos and testimonials coming soon).  Also, take a look at our “Get a Life” one-pager.

Why do people love working for EmployeeScreenIQ?  Have you got a minute or 10?

  • We’re growing, growing, growing.  So if you’re looking for a new full time career with great benefits and potential for upward mobility, look no more.
  • Don’t want to work evenings or weekends?  No problem.  This is definitely a 9-5 gig which allows you to actually have a life outside of work.
  • We pay you to have lunch! Lunch time and daily breaks are not deducted from your salary.  You work hard. Why not reap the benefits?
  • Sweat the details with a smile and reap the rewards!  Our employees are rewarded for getting it right and delivering superior client service.
  • Interested in helping others?  EmployeeScreenIQ and our team members are motivated to be charitable. For example, want to wear jeans to work every day? Just donate $4 per week to an approved charity of your choice.
  • We know how to play.  Work doesn’t have to be boring and we offer a lot of activities from ping-pong to company picnics to summer ice-cream truck appearances and outings to Cavs and Indians games.
  • We can’t save the world, but we try.  EmployeeScreenIQ recycles over 4000 lbs. per year which equates to 45 trees!
  • And don’t worry about a revolving door of management.  The EmployeeScreenIQ executive leadership team hasn’t changed since we opened the doors in 1999.

So are you ready to get a life?  Why the delay? Visit http://www.employeescreen.com/careers.asp to see our current openings and complete our online application to get started.

Kevin W. Grossman On Future Use of Resumes and Resume Fraud

We’ve just posted a guest article on EmployeeScreen University about the efficacy of resumes in today’s marketplace authored by Kevin W. Grossman, Chief Marketplace Evangelist at Fisher Vista, LLC and HRmarketer.com Check it out.

Okay, it’s not dead yet, but I want it to die.

I understand that there’s still a huge part of the career management industry keeping it alive, making it better and making it work for you, the job seeker. To all my friends in this industry, please forgive me, as I also understand it’s probably not going anywhere for years to come.

But I still want the painfully ubiquitous resume to die a horrible death.

Why? Because it’s a self-serving piece of inconsistently formatted and fudged professional drivel that really doesn’t help me hire true quality of fit. Just ask any background screening firm that does employment and education verifications. For example, EmployeeScreenIQ’s research yields a 52% discrepancy rate between what an applicant claims about their education and work experience and what they find when they verify such information.

Fifty-two percent. Sure, the resume helps me sift and sort to the short list, but a short list that’s almost half fabrication on the average. And if you as the job seeker take that risk and blatantly lie or embellish on your resume, and my background screening firm uncovers it, you are out of luck at a time of high unemployment where you really need a little luck.

Yes, embellishing the truth is fabrication. It doesn’t make it any better than an outright lie, especially if you’re telling me you’ve been programming native iPhone apps for the past six months and you really only took an online course six months ago and made one farting app, one that isn’t very good anyway because it sounds like a Yorkshire Terrier barking.

So what then do we put instead of this black magic resume full of lies and deceit?

Your professional online profile, of course. Like the one you better have completely up to date on LinkedIn, where thousands of recruiting professionals are scouring and sourcing every day. (And I’m not even talking about the majority of recruiting pros who search for online information about you across the internet and other social networks.) And by the way, much of the same advice you may get about building your resume applies to the online profile as well.

However, I get the fact that anybody can fudge an online profile just as well as they can a resume. But, there’s a peer pressure element of keeping one another honest in an online community where your professional history is available to everyone you’re connected with, many of whom you‘ve worked with or for at one time, if not currently, as well as the portion that’s available for public consumption if you so choose.

Read More

The Resume Is Dead. Long Live The Online Profile!

Guest Article by Kevin W. Grossman

Okay, it’s not dead yet, but I want it to die.

I understand that there’s still a huge part of the career management industry keeping it alive, making it better and making it work for you, the job seeker. To all my friends in this industry, please forgive me, as I also understand it’s probably not going anywhere for years to come.

But I still want the painfully ubiquitous resume to die a horrible death.

Why? Because it’s a self-serving piece of inconsistently formatted and fudged professional drivel that really doesn’t help me hire true quality of fit. Just ask any background screening firm that does employment and education verifications. For example, EmployeeScreenIQ’s research yields a 52% discrepancy rate between what an applicant claims about their education and work experience and what they find when they verify such information.

Fifty-two percent. Sure, the resume helps me sift and sort to the short list, but a short list that’s almost half fabrication on the average. And if you as the job seeker take that risk and blatantly lie or embellish on your resume, and my background screening firm uncovers it, you are out of luck at a time of high unemployment where you really need a little luck.

Yes, embellishing the truth is fabrication. It doesn’t make it any better than an outright lie, especially if you’re telling me you’ve been programming native iPhone apps for the past six months and you really only took an online course six months ago and made one farting app, one that isn’t very good anyway because it sounds like a Yorkshire Terrier barking.

So what then do we put instead of this black magic resume full of lies and deceit?

Your professional online profile, of course. Like the one you better have completely up to date on LinkedIn, where thousands of recruiting professionals are scouring and sourcing every day. (And I’m not even talking about the majority of recruiting pros who search for online information about you across the internet and other social networks.) And by the way, much of the same advice you may get about building your resume applies to the online profile as well.

However, I get the fact that anybody can fudge an online profile just as well as they can a resume. But, there’s a peer pressure element of keeping one another honest in an online community where your professional history is available to everyone you’re connected with, many of whom you‘ve worked with or for at one time, if not currently, as well as the portion that’s available for public consumption if you so choose.

And there’s another critical element that can give you more credibility than the standard 3-5 references you offer “on request” for your resume. Those are the LinkedIn recommendations you ask your current and previous employers, colleagues, collaborators, clients, customers, mentors, teachers and/or friends to give you, which you in turn should always reciprocate.

Repeat – get as many recommendations as you can and reciprocate.

Remember, your professional connections you “know” could also be the back doors into the employers you’re interested in, as well as getting introduced to those folks you don’t know.

Repeat – get as many recommendations as you can and reciprocate.

There are also other similar professional networks on Facebook like BranchOut and BeKnown, which allow you to give and receive “endorsements” like the LinkedIn recommendations. Do the same thing here and be consistent across all the professional networks you belong to where you have profiles.

Granted, talent acquisition technologies including applicant tracking systems (ATS) have been slow to adapt to the online profile – there’s still the “click here” to upload your resume. That’s changing for the better as the candidate experience improves allowing for easy integration of the online profile to the employer of choice, not to mention the benefits of a search optimized professional profile, which is a blog post for another time.

So let’s review:

  • Build those online profiles consistently across your professional networks of choice (LinkedIn for sure).
  • Keep your profiles honest and real and up to date, whether you’re looking for a job or not.
  • Get those recommendations and endorsements and reciprocate.

There’s a lot more to cover here than I could get to, so look for more soon. Good luck!

About the Author:

Kevin W. Grossman is the Chief Marketplace Evangelist at Fisher Vista, LLC and HRmarketer.com where he leads the strategic HR B2B marketing and business development initiatives. Kevin is also founder of Marcom HRsay, an HR B2B blog for the real world focusing on what helps the people thrive and businesses grow. Kevin has more than two decades of business experience including more than 10 years of HR marketplace experience. Kevin is a Top 25 Online Influencer in Human Resources according to HR Examiner as well as a prolific “HR business” blogger since 2004 primarily on Marketing to HR and Marcom HRsay. He has authored multiple articles on HR, leadership, HR technology, talent acquisition, talent management, workplace culture and much more. He’s also a partner and collaborator of the TalentCulture community with as well as a co-founder of the online Twitter chat #TChat and #TChat Radio.

Just What Is the EEOC Thinking About Criminal Background Checks?

Labor and employment attorney, Jon Hyman of the Ohio Employer’s Law Blog fame posted an story about a recent opinion letter issued to the Peace Corp. on how to properly perform background checks on their volunteers.  The advice they provided is truly insightful as to what they might have in mind following their July hearings. Check out Jon’s post below. I have highlighted items to take note of.

The Peace Corps asked the EEOC for an opinion on the legality of its use of conviction and arrest records to screen potential volunteers. In response, the EEOC published an informal opinion letter, which offers guidance for employers who are considering using conviction or arrest [records] as part of their screening processes.

Conviction Records

  • According to the EEOC, conviction records have the potential to have a disparate impact on African Americans and Hispanics. Therefore, employers should only use them when “job related and consistent with business necessity.”
  • To ensure that applicants’ criminal history information is used in a way that is consistent with Title VII, the EEOC recommends that employers limit criminal history inquiries to convictions that are related to the specific positions in question, and that have taken place in the past seven years.

Arrest Records

  • Arrest records are different than conviction records because of their inherent unreliability. For example, they are not persuasive evidence that the person engaged in the alleged conduct, and may also be poorly reported or updated.
  • If employers decided that arrest records serve a useful purpose in screening applicants, their use should be limited to offenses related to the specific position.
  • To account for the potential unreliability of arrest records, employers should also provide applicants a reasonable opportunity to dispute their validity.

So, there are two things in here that provide some insight as to where they are going on this.

  • Employers should only use information from the past 7 years.  This jibes with California laws, but most other places throughout the country do not place time restrictions on convictions that can be considered.
  • Employers should give applicants the opportunity to dispute the information on arrest records.  Now, like you, my first thoughts were that they have that right as part of the Adverse Action process.  However, based on some remarks that I’ve heard from those in attendance at last week’s NAPBS conference, this is something they would want before the adverse action process begins.  So, they want a “pre-pre-adverse action” process?

Top Chef Behaving Badly: Indicted on Child Porn Charges

According to People Magazine (yes, I really just quoted People), Top Chef finalist, Morgan Wilson has been indicted on charges of possession and intent to distribute child pornography.

Now, to be fair to the Bravo television network, it looks like the arrest took place after the show was aired last fall.  However, Wilson does hold a job with the Ritz Carlton hotel in Dallas.

So, here’s the question.  Should the hotel have known about this arrest?  Well, he was hired in 2007, so a background check at that time wouldn’t have revealed these charges.  It is, however surprising that the hotel wouldn’t have heard about this before the indictment was announced earlier this month given Wilson’s high profile status.

Okay, so let’s say that the hotel wasn’t aware of the arrest and charges.  What could they have done?  Many organizations are now performing criminal background checks on their employees on a regularly scheduled basis to ensure that nothing has changed since the time of their hiring.  Now, I certainly can’t fault the Ritz for not doing this, since those that do are still in the minority.  Just something to think about though.  In this case, it certainly might have helped keep their name out of the papers.

P.S. Not that the allegations against Chef Robert Irvine for resume fraud were even close to as serious, but this isn’t the first time a television chef has fallen from grace.

Worried About the Expense of Crime Insurance? Try Background Checks

I’m always looking for ways to incorporate math into the rationale for a strong background screening program. This quote from a recent article about employee theft caught my eye, as it’s a sentiment we’ve echoed for years.

“A $100,000 loss to a $3 million company is more damaging than a $100,000 loss to a billion-dollar organization,” Mr. Karpp said.

Sounds like an endorsement of background checks, right?

Nope.

It’s from an article discussing companies that buy “crime insurance.” A product I’m not familiar with but one I’m sure has fat profit margins which we could calculate with a spreadsheet and a few free hours. But not everyone is sold on it…

Lee McGriff, principal of McGriff-Williams Insurance, an independent insurance agency in Gainesville, Fla., said he has found that many small and midsize business owners are reluctant to buy crime coverage “because they trust their employees explicitly. But my experience has been that when this comes to roost, it’s usually the most trusted employee who is the culprit.”

Click here to read the full story.

http://www.crainscleveland.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20111020/FREE/111019838

We too run into same resistance mentioned in the article when companies think “that couldn’t happen here.” Oddly, the article didn’t even mention background checks which I like to think lower the probability of getting ripped off, incurring the emotional and financial costs, the marketplace embarrassment, the press coverage, and the real expense of the $10,000 deductible cited.

But it’s the price, and not really the product, that strikes me the most. A $100 million dollar company is cited as an example, so let’s look at the numbers.

A $10,000 deductible and a $3,000-$4,000 annual premium get $1,000,000 worth of coverage. If there’s a claim in year 5, that company has already spent nearly $20,000-$30,000. Even if there isn’t a claim, they’ve already paid several thousand dollars for that premium year after year after year.

But a technology company for instance, might spend $15,000 (cost estimated through conventional industry sales per employee ratios) screening their ENTIRE workforce.

Even if you still bought coverage, you save money because there’s a lower chance you pay that $10,000 deductible. You’ve done a better job managing risk. Then add the benefits of doing things better, lower turnover, making more money, etc. because you have a stronger team competing in the marketplace.

Our clients? They already know EmployeeScreenIQ provides them with “crime insurance.”

They’re called background checks.

10/20/2011 Update of New California E-Verify Law

We reported earlier this week that the state of California had banned the use of E-Verify for the state’s employers.  It has since been pointed out and confirmed that state has not banned the use of E-Verify, but instead banned anyone in the state (i.e. state, county, local governments) from mandating its’ use.

We apologize for the oversight on our behalf.