Less Security Checkpoint Screening for Airline Personnel

According to The Baltimore Sun:

“New security screening procedures will be tested at O’Hare International Airport starting this summer to allow pilots to speed through checkpoints without undergoing scans or pat-downs, officials said.

It’s a first step toward transitioning to a more logical risk-based screening and away from the current system of treating pilots and passengers as equal potential security threats, according to the Transportation Security Administration

Expedited screening of flight attendants, who undergo less rigorous security and background checks than pilots during the hiring process, will occur later, officials said.”

Really?  Hasn’t the TSA learned anything from the recent incident at Miami International Airport where an illegal immigrant from Guyana was found working as a flight attendant?  This person was able to get this job using a stolen identity and his deception was not uncovered during the background screening process – it only came to light after the identity theft victim attempted to apply for food stamps and was denied because government records matched his SSN to the airline job.

I think before the TSA grants less rigorous security to airline personnel, they need to work with the airlines to ensure incidents like this don’t happen! 

New screening will let pilots fly through security

Florida Gov. Rejects Bill That Would Weaken Background Checks

I’ll keep this one short and sweet.  Kudos to Florida Governor Rick Scott for vetoing a bill that would have allowed some volunteer workers with in-home social service groups to avoid background checks.

Who in their right mind would think this bill was a good idea?  Haven’t we already seen enough stories (especially out of Florida) which deal with abuse of the elderly and those with disabilities?  Haven’t we seen our fair share of stories these folks are robbed blind by people offering in-home care?

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6/23/2011 Introducing iEmployeeScreen mobile: Background Screening News at Your Fingertips


Download Now!

iEmployeeScreen Mobile is coming soon and we wanted you to be the first to know!

iEmployeeScreen Mobile provides you with a 360-degree understanding of emerging technology, the ever-changing world of legislation and regulations, plus the latest trends and best practices in employment screening.

  • Expert articles, legislative updates and other industry happenings.
  • It’s like having the EmployeeScreenIQ website at your fingertips!

Register to be notified when iEmployeeScreen mobile app is available

Coming to ?

Visit EmployeeScreenIQ at SHRM in Las Vegas (booth #2557), where we’ll be giving away iTunes gift certificates for the first, 100th, and 500th mobile app downloads.

Introducing iEmployeeScreen mobile: Background Screening News at Your Fingertips


Download Now!

iEmployeeScreen Mobile is coming soon and we wanted you to be the first to know!

iEmployeeScreen Mobile provides you with a 360-degree understanding of emerging technology, the ever-changing world of legislation and regulations, plus the latest trends and best practices in employment screening.

  • Expert articles, legislative updates and other industry happenings.
  • It’s like having the EmployeeScreenIQ website at your fingertips!

Register to be notified when iEmployeeScreen mobile app is available

Coming to ?

Visit EmployeeScreenIQ at SHRM in Las Vegas (booth #2557), where we’ll be giving away iTunes gift certificates for the first, 100th, and 500th mobile app downloads.

Top Secret Clearance Granted on Fake Background Checks

Who’s screening the screeners?  This is a question we’ve been asking for many years.  Nothing shoots a big gaping hole into a good background screening plan like when the people who are charged with the oversight of the plan decide not to run the background checks.

Such is the case that we are now reading about where background checks were falsified and individuals were granted top-secret government clearance without the checks actually being performed.

According to the Washington Times, “court records show at least 170 confirmed falsifications of interviews or record checks and more than 1,000 others that couldn’t be verified. The background investigators, whose work helps determine who gets top-secret security clearance, were submitting forms saying they conducted interviews or verified official documents when they never did.”

And while the motive for these falsifications was not offered in the article, I chalk it up to pure laziness.  Yes, these investigators are being overwhelmed with requests for these clearances, but this is our national security we’re talking about.

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The ICE Man Cometh: Employers Get Your I-9’s in Order

Employers beware.  The Iceman cometh. Last week the Obama administration announced that it would audit another 1,000 employers throughout the United States to determine if they are have illegal workers on their payrolls.

The Wall Street Journal reports that this wave of ICE audits now brings this fiscal year’s total to 2,388 (beginning Oct. 1) which has already eclipsed last year’s total of 2,196.

The Journal warns, “For employers, the audits can lead to both civil and criminal penalties. The possibilities range from fines and being barred from competing for government contracts to criminal charges of knowingly employing illegal workers, evading taxes and engaging in identity theft.”

See WSJ Article

The best way for an employer to stay in compliance with federal regulations is to be vigilant in their I-9 practices. Every employee must have an I-9 form on file.

Many employers are moving towards the use of the government’s E-Verify system or other third party systems which allow for the complete electronic automation of the I-9 process; preparing and signing the form, submitting the form to the Social Security Administration, and auto archiving.

Everyone get the image of Top Gun’s Iceman, Val Kilmer?

Flight Attendant Background Check

Illegal-alien airline security shocker

By LARRY CELONA and BILL SANDERSON

In a colossal failure of 9/11 security measures, an illegal immigrant used the stolen ID of a Bronx man with an arrest record to get hired as an airline flight attendant, and flew several trips as a trainee before he was busted yesterday, authorities said.

Besides getting a job at American Eagle, Jophan Porter, 38, used the stolen ID to obtain a US passport, a US Department of Transportation ID card and at least three Florida driver’s licenses, law-enforcement sources told The Post.

Porter was caught after ID-theft victim Anthony Frair of The Bronx was denied food stamps because government records matched him to the airline job.

A law-enforcement source confirmed that Frair, 40, has an arrest record. Public records show a man with his name and age was busted in Florida in 2008 on domestic-assault charges.

It’s unclear how long Porter used Frair’s identity, sources said. American Eagle hired him in March, and he worked from the airline’s Miami base, said company spokesman Tim Smith.

Smith and spokespersons for several federal agencies couldn’t explain how Porter cleared the security checks needed to become a flight attendant — or why the airline didn’t realize the ID he had stolen belonged to a criminal suspect.

Smith couldn’t say whether the airline even did a Google search, which would have uncovered Frair’s arrest in Florida.

Porter was born in Guyana, and records show he’s also a former Bronx resident.

He was arrested at Miami International Airport early yesterday just after he’d returned from a personal trip to London on an American Airlines flight, Smith said.

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Insider Trading at NASDAQ Underscores Importance of Background Checks

A former NASDAQ employee, Donald Johnson recently pleaded guilty to defrauding investors of over $750,000.  In this day and age, that amount is child’s play compared to some of the high profile fraud cases we’ve seen over the last couple years, but that’s really here nor there.  The thing that has left one Forbes blogger scratching her head is that this crime was totally avoidable.

All NASDAQ had to do was to conduct a thorough background check and they would have known that Johnson’s past would have provided a clear snapshot of what his future tenure with the company might hold.

According to Joelle Scott, “Nasdaq hired Johnson in 1989.  Three years prior, the Virginia Board of Nursing commenced an investigation into Johnson.  He had been working at Fairfax Hospital and, as a result of the investigation, according to the records from this department, Johnson admitted he had not only consumed Schedule II drugs while on duty as a nurse but also falsified hospital records in order to steal these drugs from the hospital.  Johnson was discharged from the U.S. Army Reserves where he was a captain and served as a nurse.”

Surely, a Professional License Verification with the Virginia Board of Nursing would have revealed information that would have raised red flags about Johnson.

NASDAQ claims to have conducted a background check on Johnson at the time of his hire, to which Scott reserves comments which should be shared over and over again with the myriad politicians and government agencies who seek to limit or ban the use of these vitally important employment screening practices.

“As we have explained to clients (both potential and existing) for over 20 years, comprehensive background checks are designed to uncover this sort of information to protect investors, board members, corporations and others.  Contacting licensing departments and appropriate regulatory bodies is an essential component of background checks.  This includes not only identifying any sanctions or disciplinary actions filed by the major regulatory agencies (SEC, FINRA, etc.) but also independently reaching out to government bodies that oversee the professions in which an individual has been involved from OSHA to the Departments of Nursing. These agencies provide critical information about an individual.

Johnson is one of many.  We have seen numerous people lie about degrees received from Ivy League schools and certifications received (yes, people still lie about this stuff!) and, like Johnson, people who voluntarily do not disclose their troubled pasts hoping no one will check.”

Click here for more information about what employers in the financial services industry should consider when screening potential candidates.