EmployeeScreenIQ Announces Strategic Alliance with UK’s Verifile Ltd.

EmployeeScreenIQ is pleased to announce a strategic alliance with Verifile Ltd. the UK’s leading provider of CV Verification & Background Screening Services. This partnership will allow our clients with a European presence to streamline their screening efforts through local support, reinforce local privacy laws and align them with the same best-in-class service they currently experience here in the U.S. Likewise, EmployeeScreenIQ will be offering the same for Verifile’s clientele with a U.S. presence.

“Verifile’s commitment to best practices and compliance make this synergy a natural fit for our clients that look to us as a global leader in the employment screening field,” said EmployeeScreenIQ president and chief operating officer, Jason B. Morris. “Their vast experience and capabilities in Europe will allow us to offer both consultation and services that expand beyond those currently offered.”

Both companies are the foremost authorities when it comes to educating the marketplace about employment background checks. In fact, they have already worked together to share data and consultation when it comes to combating the ongoing threat of diploma mills. Together, they will continue this commitment to collaborate on greater learning opportunities for human resource professionals.

“EmployeeScreenIQ’s award winning customer service and US marketplace leadership makes them a perfect fit for our European clients,” said Verifile managing director, Eyal Ben Cohen. “With the ever growing movement of workforce between the US and Europe, EmployeeScreenIQ and Verifile can now jointly offer greater capabilities to our global clients.”

EmployeeScreenIQ Announces Strategic Alliance with UK's Verifile Ltd.

EmployeeScreenIQ is pleased to announce a strategic alliance with Verifile Ltd. the UK’s leading provider of CV Verification & Background Screening Services. This partnership will allow our clients with a European presence to streamline their screening efforts through local support, reinforce local privacy laws and align them with the same best-in-class service they currently experience here in the U.S.   Likewise, EmployeeScreenIQ will be offering the same for Verifile’s clientele with a U.S. presence.

“Verifile’s commitment to best practices and compliance make this synergy a natural fit for our clients that look to us as a global leader in the employment screening field,” said EmployeeScreenIQ president and chief operating officer, Jason B. Morris. “Their vast experience and capabilities in Europe will allow us to offer both consultation and services that expand beyond those currently offered.”

Both companies are the foremost authorities when it comes to educating the marketplace about employment background checks. In fact, they have already worked together to share data and consultation when it comes to combating the ongoing threat of diploma mills. Together, they will continue this commitment to collaborate on greater learning opportunities for human resource professionals.

“EmployeeScreenIQ’s award winning customer service and US marketplace leadership makes them a perfect fit for our European clients,” said Verifile managing director, Eyal Ben Cohen. “With the ever growing movement of workforce between the US and Europe, EmployeeScreenIQ and Verifile can now jointly offer greater capabilities to our global clients.”

10/10/2010 HR Southwest Conference

EmployeeScreenIQ will be exhibiting at the 69th Annual HR Southwest Conference in Fort Worth, Texas at the Fort Worth Convention Center October 10-13, 2010.

The HRSouthwest Conference is the largest regional human resources conference in the United States. The Conference offers world-renowned keynote speakers, over 100 concurrent educational sessions including three Mega Sessions, networking opportunities and exposure to the newest HR products, techniques and services. The HRSouthwest Conference is THE Conference that meets and exceeds your HR education needs!

A Background Check on Billy the Kid

billykid_posterI am about to make a claim that is rather embarrassing as a background screening professional.  My childhood hero was the famous outlaw, Billy the Kid.  I grew up on horseback, I competed in cowboy style competitions at a very young age and always had the famous Billy Joel song, “The Ballad of Billy the Kid” playing in my head!  I was excited (yet still embarrassed) today when I saw that New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson is considering a posthumous pardon for this western legend!

According to Wikipedia:

Henry McCarty, better known as Billy the Kid, but also known by the aliases Henry Antrim and William H. Bonney (reportedly November 23, 1859 – July 14, 1881), was a 19th century American frontier outlaw and gunman who participated in the Lincoln County War. According to legend, he killed 21 men, but he is generally accepted to have killed four. Pat Garrett shot Billy the Kid down on July 14, 1881. Garrett tracked him after the outlaw escaped from the Lincoln County jail in a famous gunbattle that left two deputies dead.

Billy’s background check would look rather interesting with all the alias names he has gone by.  His criminal record is arguable at best and his death has been debated by historians for years.  According to a recent article:

220px-BillykidThe pardon dispute is the latest in a long-running fight over whether Garrett shot the real Kid or someone else and then lied about it. Some history buffs  claim Billy the Kid didn’t die in the shootout with Garrett and landed in Texas, where he went by “Brushy Bill” Roberts and died of a heart attack at age 90 in 1950.

If I can have it my way, I’ll stick with Billy Joel’s version:

Well one cold day a posse captured Billy
And the judge said “String him up for what he did.”
And the cowboys and their kin
Like the sea, came pouring in
To watch the hanging of Billy the kid.

Well he never travelled heavy
Yes he always rode alone
And he soon put many older guns to shame
And he never had a sweetheart
But he finally found a home

Under the boothill grave that bears his name.
Read the rest of the story and judge for yourself!  Ride on Billy!!

Join a Free EmployeeScreenIQ Demo on Employment Screening

Did you know that if current incarceration rates continue, one in 15 Americans will serve time in prison? And that doesn’t include people with convictions who don’t serve time.

Join EmployeeScreenIQ’s web demonstration to learn why our 20% criminal hit rate is no accident… and how you can achieve the same results needed to make an informed hiring decision!

Find out why you want to perform Smarter Screening and Intelligent Hiring using:

  • Comprehensive Criminal Record Searches
  • Strict Oversight & Accuracy
  • Stringent Risk Management & Compliance

We are offering this 30 minute demonstration on August 11th, 18th and 25th at 2 p.m. EST. To participate, simply click on a session below and complete our brief Webex registration form. Registration for each session is limited to the first 100 respondents.

Join a Free EmployeeScreenIQ Demo on Employment Screening

imgDid you know that if current incarceration rates continue, one in 15 Americans will serve time in prison? And that doesn’t include people with convictions who don’t serve time.

Join EmployeeScreenIQ’s web demonstration to learn why our 20% criminal hit rate is no accident… and how you can achieve the same results needed to make an informed hiring decision!

Find out why you want to perform Smarter Screening and Intelligent Hiring using:

  • Comprehensive Criminal Record Searches
  • Strict Oversight & Accuracy
  • Stringent Risk Management & Compliance

signupWe are offering this 30 minute demonstration on August 11th, 18th and 25th at 2 p.m. EST. To participate, simply click on a session below and complete our brief Webex registration form. Registration for each session is limited to the first 100 respondents.

Team Obama Might Want to Conduct Better Background Checks

 

Last week, President Obama called on congress to extend unemployment insurance. In a speech given on the White House lawn the president said, “We need to extend unemployment compensation benefits for women like Leslie Macko, who lost her job at a fitness center last year, and has been looking for work ever since. Because she’s eligible for only a few more weeks of unemployment, she’s doing what she never thought she’d have to do. Not at this point, anyway. She’s turning to her father for support.”

Well, she may be turning to her father for support, but she’s turning to her lawyer for advice about how to respond to reports that she was terminated from her job after being found guilty of prescription drug fraud. As Homer Simpson would say, “DOH!”

Team Obama might want to perform more thorough background checks in the future.

See story below from The Charlottesville Newspaper:

Charlottesville resident Leslie Macko was once employed at ACAC in the Albemarle Square Shopping Center. In April 2009, she lost her job as an aesthetician in the spa at ACAC.

President Barack Obama called on Congress last week to extend unemployment insurance. Macko stood next to the President of the United States as his example of the need to extend jobless benefits.

CBS19’s Jessica Jaglois has learned that Macko was found guilty of prescription drug fraud in March 2009, one month before Macko lost her job at ACAC. She served a one year probationary sentence.

Macko joined two other unemployed people and President Obama at the podium for a speech designed to encourage lawmakers to extend jobless benefits.

“We need to extend unemployment compensation benefits for women like Leslie Macko, who lost her job at a fitness center last year, and has been looking for work ever since. Because she’s eligible for only a few more weeks of unemployment, she’s doing what she never thought she’d have to do. Not at this point, anyway. She’s turning to her father for financial support,” Obama said in his speech.

ACAC owner Phil Wendel was unable to tell CBS19 if Macko was terminated because of the conviction. There’s also no indication from the court file that Macko lost her job because of the court case, or that she has received unemployment benefits improperly.

CBS19 contacted Leslie Macko about the conviction, and she declined to comment until she speaks with her attorney. We have also reached out to the White House to see if they know the full story behind the woman they chose to stand next to President Obama, but have not received comment from them either.

DHS Rules on Electronic Signature and Storage of Form I-9

On July 22, 2010 the Department of Homeland Security published a final rule on the acceptance of electronic signatures and storage of the Form I-9.  The rule, scheduled to take effect August 23, 2010, allows employers to prepare, sign, scan and store the form electronically as long as certain criteria is met.  See below.

In this final rule, DHS makes minor modifications to 8 CFR 274a.2 to clarify certain provisions that:

  • Employers must complete a Form I-9 within three business (not calendar) days;
  • Employers may use paper, electronic systems, or a combination of paper and electronic systems;
  • Employers may change electronic storage systems as long as the systems meet the performance requirements of the regulations;
  • Employers need not retain audit trails of each time a Form
  • I-9 is electronically viewed, but only when the Form I-9 is created,completed, updated, modified, altered, or corrected; and
  • Employers may provide or transmit a confirmation of a Form I-9 transaction, but are not required to do so unless the employee requests a copy.

SHRM’s Allen Smith, J.D. writes that, “Several commenters on the interim final rule requested guidance on the storage of ancillary documents used to verify an employee’s identity and eligibility to work in the United States. DHS clarified that employers may, but are not required to, copy or make an electronic image of a document used to comply. It cautioned, though, that employers should apply consistent policies and procedures for all employees to avoid discrimination.

DHS noted that the Form I-9 and verification documentation may be stored in a separate Form I-9 file or as part of an employee’s other employment records. In addition, only the pages of the Form I-9 containing employer- and employee-entered data need be retained. Other pages of the current form are instructions for completing the Form I-9 and need not be retained.

DHS agreed with comments that suggested that it is unnecessary to require an audit trail to record every time a Form I-9 is simply viewed or accessed but not modified. When the Form I-9 is created or modified, though, a secure and permanent record must be created establishing the date of access, the identity of the individual who accessed the electronic record and the particular action taken.

In response to comments, DHS also amended the interim final rule to require an employer to provide or transmit a confirmation of the transaction only if an employee requests it. Several commenters had objected to the interim final rule’s requirement that a printed transaction record be given to the employee even absent a request.
One commenter noted that some companies process thousands of new employees annually; another noted that in the modern work environment many employees work off site. These commenters expressed concern that requiring paper receipts could be a significant burden to businesses. DHS officials did not think the requirement was unduly burdensome but amended the interim final rule in response to the comments.

If requested, a receipt when completing an electronic record should be provided within a reasonable period of time, but it need not be provided at the time of the transaction.

But DHS cautioned that providing the option of electronic preparation and storage does not alter the requirement that the employer physically examine any documentation provided by the employee in the presence of the employee prior to completing the Form I-9.”

7/22/2010 DHS Rules on Electronic Signature and Storage of Form I-9

On July 22, 2010 the Department of Homeland Security published a final rule on the acceptance of electronic signatures and storage of the Form I-9.  The rule, scheduled to take effect August 23, 2010, allows employers to prepare, sign, scan and store the form electronically as long as certain criteria is met. See below.

In this final rule, DHS makes minor modifications to 8 CFR 274a.2 to clarify certain provisions that:

  • Employers must complete a Form I-9 within three business (not calendar) days;
  • Employers may use paper, electronic systems, or a combination of paper and electronic systems;
  • Employers may change electronic storage systems as long as the systems meet the performance requirements of the regulations;
  • Employers need not retain audit trails of each time a Form
  • I-9 is electronically viewed, but only when the Form I-9 is created,completed, updated, modified, altered, or corrected; and
  • Employers may provide or transmit a confirmation of a Form I-9 transaction, but are not required to do so unless the employee requests a copy.

SHRM’s Allen Smith, J.D. writes that, “Several commenters on the interim final rule requested guidance on the storage of ancillary documents used to verify an employee’s identity and eligibility to work in the United States. DHS clarified that employers may, but are not required to, copy or make an electronic image of a document used to comply. It cautioned, though, that employers should apply consistent policies and procedures for all employees to avoid discrimination.

DHS noted that the Form I-9 and verification documentation may be stored in a separate Form I-9 file or as part of an employee’s other employment records. In addition, only the pages of the Form I-9 containing employer- and employee-entered data need be retained. Other pages of the current form are instructions for completing the Form I-9 and need not be retained.

DHS agreed with comments that suggested that it is unnecessary to require an audit trail to record every time a Form I-9 is simply viewed or accessed but not modified. When the Form I-9 is created or modified, though, a secure and permanent record must be created establishing the date of access, the identity of the individual who accessed the electronic record and the particular action taken.

In response to comments, DHS also amended the interim final rule to require an employer to provide or transmit a confirmation of the transaction only if an employee requests it. Several commenters had objected to the interim final rule’s requirement that a printed transaction record be given to the employee even absent a request.
One commenter noted that some companies process thousands of new employees annually; another noted that in the modern work environment many employees work off site. These commenters expressed concern that requiring paper receipts could be a significant burden to businesses. DHS officials did not think the requirement was unduly burdensome but amended the interim final rule in response to the comments.

If requested, a receipt when completing an electronic record should be provided within a reasonable period of time, but it need not be provided at the time of the transaction.

But DHS cautioned that providing the option of electronic preparation and storage does not alter the requirement that the employer physically examine any documentation provided by the employee in the presence of the employee prior to completing the Form I-9.”

Is Continuous Employment Screening on the Rise?

Let’s say you have a sales person that regularly drives their vehicle to appointments as a part of their job.  When you ran a background check at the time of hire, their driving record was just fine.  Well, fast forward two years and their license is now suspended due to a DUI or multiple moving violations.  Now, that person causes an accident while on their way to a big appointment and the person in the other vehicle wants to be compensated for the troubles.  Of course, they are going to look to your sales person, but there’s a much bigger pocket behind them.  Your business, who should have known that the license was suspended.

I recently had a great conversation with Barry Nixon, Chief Operating Officer of the PreemploymentDirectory.com about the prevalence of infinity screening; the concept of performing background checks on existing employees at scheduled intervals throughout their employment.  He was doing some research for a follow up article to his original piece on this concept written five years ago and wanted to know if it had really caught on as many of us expected it would.

I’ll leave the lion share of our discussion to Barry, but as we talked about why I believe the concept has only had a tepid response from the marketplace, I had a bit of an epiphany.  When we first got into this business in 1999, we would meet with companies large and small and explain not only why they should choose us to conduct their employment background checks, but why they should screen at all.  Oftentimes, we heard that they didn’t have any problems with their employees: workplace violence, internal theft, resume fraud, etc. After these meetings we’d say that we would hear from them as soon as they had a negative incident and sure enough, we did.

And while the concept of performing a criminal background check, Motor Vehicle Record Check, etc. on current employees has caught on among some, the same principle applies: the catalyst to drive interest for most will only come after they experience a negative incident or pattern of negative behavior.

While I believe that the concept is indeed a valuable tool for continued risk management, I can’t argue with the attitudes of those sitting on the sidelines.  Most of us make buying decisions based on such reactions.  Take our example above.  If the company experiences loss based on the incident above, they might just be moved to consider such a program.