2/25/2010 EmployeeScreenIQ Names Industry Veteran as New National Accounts Manager

Karla Flinn joins background screening company, will focus on Enterprise-level accounts

Cleveland, OH (PRWEB) / February 25, 2010 – EmployeeScreenIQ, a global leader in the employment background screening industry, is pleased to announce the addition of Karla Flinn as its new National Accounts Manager.

Flinn has been in the employment screening field for over 10 years and has a proven track record in business development and implementation of employment background checks, substance abuse screening and on-boarding programs.  She has achieved numerous awards reflecting her successes in new business development and client retention, assisting clients with program transitions, and optimizing program designs to match the needs of prospective clients.

Her new responsibilities focus on driving revenue growth for the organization with enterprise-level accounts.

“We are thrilled to welcome Karla as a member of our team and know that her dedication and experience will allow her to flourish in this new role,” said Jason B. Morris, EmployeeScreenIQ president and chief operating officer.  “Her ability to develop lasting relationships with human resource professionals through a consultative approach makes Karla a perfect fit for our organization.”

“I am excited to become a member of the EmployeeScreenIQ team,” said Flinn, “and feel fortunate to be joining such a highly regarded company and contribute to its rapid growth.”

Massachusetts Data Security Law: Employers Take Note

Please note that the Massachusetts Data Security Regulations take affect on March 1, 2010.  This impacts all employers in the state that collect personal identifying information such as a person’s name and any or all of the following: Social Security Number, drivers license or state ID number, financial account or credit number.  Most employers gather at least a portion of this information during the on-boarding process and certainly need it if they conduct background checks.

In order to comply,  employers must have in place a written information security program (“WISP”) by 3/1/10.

View Press Release from MA Office of Consumer Affairs

Massachusetts Data Security Law: Employers Take Note

Please note that the Massachusetts Data Security Regulations take affect on March 1, 2010.  This impacts all employers in the state (whether they are based in the state or employ people there) that collect personal identifying information such as a person’s name and any or all of the following: Social Security Number, drivers license or state ID number, financial account or credit number.  Most employers gather at least a portion of this information during the on-boarding process and certainly need it if they conduct background checks.

In order to comply,  employers must have in place a written information security program (“WISP”) by 3/1/10.

View Press Release from MA Office of Consumer Affairs

Update:

According to Massachusetts attorney Michael S. Kraft, not only do organizations based in the state of Massachusetts need to draft a policy to protect personal information, but any business that has any employee or consumer customer located in Massachusetts.

I checked out his blog and also found other helpful advice for how employers can comply with these guidelines.

The new Massachusetts data security regulation goes into effect on Monday, March 1. If you have not yet begun to plan for the deadline, then likely either you are unaware of the requirements, or you are feeling overwhelmed by them. And who would blame you in light of the seemingly endless list of tasks:

  • Develop a written information security plan (WISP);
  • Identify all foreseeable risks in your organization by examining every nook and cranny where data enters, leaves or is stored;
  • Implement security policies and procedures and train your employees
  • Secure all paper and electronic records; provide encryption
  • Obtain written assurances from all vendors that they are compliant
  • Regularly monitor and review to insure compliance

You know that it is vitally important, both because it’s legally required and because it’s the right thing to do to protect your customers.  But where to begin? Do you need professional assistance – a lawyer or specialized IT firm to accomplish this task?  That really depends on the size and nature of your business, the data that requires protection and how much time and energy you are willing to devote to the process.  Many businesses are probably capable of accomplishing a lot on their own. For the most part, the regulation is a straightforward recitation of the tasks needed to comply. But is that the best use of your time? Noted author and business consultant Andy Birolwould caution business owners to judge very carefully those tasks that they choose to do by themselves and those that are properly delegated.

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NAPBS Launches Formal Accreditation Program

Kudos to the National Association of Professional Background Screners (NAPBS) for passing and launching the industries first accreditation program.  Since before I was Co-Chairman of NAPBS hundreds of people have put in thousands of tireless hours to get this program off the ground.  The Background Screening Credentialing Council (BSCC) was formed two years ago to take the hard work that was done previously and implement it into reality.  I couldn’t be more proud of my competitors being able to work together to finally get this done!  EmployeeScreenIQ is looking forward to the challenge of going through this process in the coming year!

napbsNew Accreditation Effort Introduces a Self-Regulating Program Poised to Change the Industry

MORRISVILLE, N.C., Feb. 24 /PRNewswire/ — The National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS®) announced today they will be launching the Background Screening Agency Accreditation Program (BSAAP), the first ever industry-specific background screening accreditation program at the opening ceremonies of the NAPBS 2010 Annual Conference on March 7th in San Antonio.

Each year, U.S. employers, organizations and governmental agencies request millions of consumer reports to assist with critical business decisions involving background screening. Background screening reports, which are categorized as consumer reports, are currently regulated at both the federal and state level.  Since its inception, NAPBS has believed that there is a strong need for a singular cohesive industry standard and created the BSAAP. Governed by a strict professional standard composed of requirements and measurements, the BSAAP is positioned to become a widely recognized seal of approval that brings national recognition to background screening organizations (also referred to as Consumer Reporting Agencies). This recognition will stand as the industry “seal” representing a background screening organization’s commitment to excellence, accountability, high professional standards and continued institutional improvement.

“The BSAAP is the industry’s primary vehicle for quality assurance, self-regulation and public accountability,” said Tracy Seabrook, CAE, executive director of NAPBS. ”Developed and sustained by background screening professionals, the BSAAP reflects, reinforces, and promotes best practices, institutional ethics, and the highest standards of background screening operations.”

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Audit Identifies Volunteers Who Posed Risk to Children

An audit conducted by New South Wales’ Auditor General has found that fourteen people employed as volunteers for children’s organizations had dangerous criminal pasts that posed a significant risk to children.   According to the Auditor General, the Children’s Commission, the organization that oversees the health and well-being of children in New South Wales, can only stop the employment of volunteers if they are found to have serious child-related offenses in their past.

Now, correct me if I’m wrong, but I would consider many different crimes unrelated to children to be a basis to deny employment to someone looking to work with children. 

1.  Murder

2.  Assault (with or without a weapon)

3. Drug Related Offenses or Use

4.  DUI (if the position requires transporting children)

5.  Sexually related offenses (against adults)

I could go on but I think you catch my drift.  NSW and the Children’s Commission better get on the ball and plug these holes in their background check process before somebody gets hurt.

Background checks leave kids vulnerable

At least 14 people known to pose a significant risk to children were employed to work with young people in New South Wales last financial year, the state’s Auditor-General has found.

ABC News Australia – February 24, 2010

An audit by Peter Achterstraat has found the process used to check people who work with children in NSW does not reliably identify everyone who poses a danger to young people.

The audit has also found that people who have been assessed as being a significant risk to children can be employed to work with them.

Releasing the findings this morning, Mr Achterstraat said there were 14 such cases last financial year.

He said the Children’s Commission could only stop people identified as being dangerous from working with children if they had been convicted of a serious child-related offence.

Mr Achterstraat said it was also not known how many volunteer organisation were running Working With Children safety checks.

“Whether we like it or not, there is a danger that perpetrators of child abuse will deliberately target voluntary associations to get access to children…” he said.

“Parents expect that people working with their children would have been checked. There is a safety net but it has got holes in it and those holes need to be mended quick smart.”

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2/25/2010 Major Impact: National Association of Professional Background Screeners Launches Formal Accreditation Program

New Accreditation Effort Introduces a Self-Regulating Program Poised to Change the Industry

MORRISVILLE, N.C.Feb. 24 /PRNewswire/ — The National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS®) announced today they will be launching the Background Screening Agency Accreditation Program (BSAAP), the first ever industry-specific background screening accreditation program at the opening ceremonies of the NAPBS 2010 Annual Conference on March 7th in San Antonio.

Each year, U.S. employers, organizations and governmental agencies request millions of consumer reports to assist with critical business decisions involving background screening. Background screening reports, which are categorized as consumer reports, are currently regulated at both the federal and state level.  Since its inception, NAPBS has believed that there is a strong need for a singular cohesive industry standard and created the BSAAP. Governed by a strict professional standard composed of requirements and measurements, the BSAAP is positioned to become a widely recognized seal of approval that brings national recognition to background screening organizations (also referred to as Consumer Reporting Agencies). This recognition will stand as the industry “seal” representing a background screening organization’s commitment to excellence, accountability, high professional standards and continued institutional improvement.

“The BSAAP is the industry’s primary vehicle for quality assurance, self-regulation and public accountability,” said Tracy Seabrook, CAE, executive director of NAPBS. “Developed and sustained by background screening professionals, the BSAAP reflects, reinforces, and promotes best practices, institutional ethics, and the highest standards of background screening operations.”

The NAPBS Background Screening Credentialing Council (BSCC) oversees the application process and is the governing accreditation body that will ensure the background screening organizations seeking accreditation meet or exceed a measurable standard of competence. To become accredited, consumer reporting agencies must pass a rigorous onsite audit, conducted by an independent auditing firm, of its policies and procedures as they relate to six critical areas: consumer protection, legal compliance, client education, product standards, service standards, and general business practices.

The BSCC will be accepting letters of intent and applications to the program at the official roll out on March 7, 2010.  Any U.S.-based employment screening organization is eligible to apply for accreditation. A copy of the standard, the policies and procedures, and measurements is available at http://www.napbs.com.

2/25/2010 Report: E-Verify misses half of illegal workers

Report: E-Verify misses half of illegal workers

By SUZANNE GAMBOA, Associated Press Writer – Thu Feb 25, 3:09 am ET

WASHINGTON – The system Congress and the Obama administration want employers to use to help curb illegal immigration is failing to catch more than half the number of unauthorized workers it checks, a research company has found.

The online tool E-Verify, now used voluntarily by employers, wrongly clears illegal workers about 54 percent of the time, according to Westat, a research company that evaluated the system for the Homeland Security Department. E-Verify missed so many illegal workers mainly because it can’t detect identity fraud, Westat said.

“Clearly it means it’s not doing its No. 1 job well enough,” said Mark Rosenblum, a researcher at the Migration Policy Institute, a nonpartisan Washington think tank.

E-Verify allows employers to run a worker’s information against Homeland Security and Social Security databases to check whether the person is permitted to work in the U.S. The Obama administration has made cracking down on employers who hire people here illegally a central part of its immigration enforcement policy, and there are expectations that some Republicans in Congress will try in coming weeks to make E-Verify mandatory.

E-Verify correctly identified legal workers 93 percent of the time, Westat said. However, previous studies have not quantified how many immigrants were fooling the E-Verify system. Much of the criticism of E-Verify has focused on whether U.S. citizens and legal immigrants with permission to work were falsely flagged as illegal workers.

Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, who is writing the Democrats’ immigration bill and has fought expanding E-Verify because of its flaws, said Wednesday that the fact that E-Verify was inaccurate so often shows that it is not an adequate tool.

“This is a wake-up call to anyone who thinks E-Verify is an effective remedy to stop the hiring of illegal immigrants,” Schumer said.

A worker verification process like E-Verify is considered essential to any immigration overhaul proposal that has any chance of approval in Congress.

Westat’s report, completed in December 2009 using data from the previous year, was quietly posted on Homeland Security’s Web site Jan. 28 along with a summary that pointed out E-Verify is accurate “almost half of the time.”

“While not perfect, it is important to note that E-Verify is much more effective” than the I-9 paper forms used by most employers, the summary said.

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Report: E-Verify Misses 50% of Illegal Workers

It’s been fairly smooth sailing for the E-Verify, the government program that allows employers to check the legal right to work status of an employee in the United states, since it was made mandatory for federal contractors last year.  That is until now, where it is being reported that this system is failing to catch more than half of all illegal workers.  The technology is not the problem, nor are Social Security Administration’s or Department of Homeland Security’s databases.  The issue lies in its inability to detect identity fraud.  In other words, if the employee fills out their I-9 Form and presents documents that contain valid information (such as a social security, passport or drivers license number), the system simply can’t tell that they belong to someone else.

I suppose this is a better problem to have then the system regularly spitting our tentative non-confirmations for legal workers, but still something that will have to be addressed in some fashion.

Report: E-Verify Misses Half of Illegal Workers

By SUZANNE GAMBOA, Associated Press Writer – Thu Feb 25, 3:09 am ET

WASHINGTON – The system Congress and the Obama administration want employers to use to help curb illegal immigration is failing to catch more than half the number of unauthorized workers it checks, a research company has found.

The online tool E-Verify, now used voluntarily by employers, wrongly clears illegal workers about 54 percent of the time, according to Westat, a research company that evaluated the system for theHomeland Security Department. E-Verify missed so many illegal workers mainly because it can’t detect identity fraud, Westat said.

“Clearly it means it’s not doing its No. 1 job well enough,” said Mark Rosenblum, a researcher at the Migration Policy Institute, a nonpartisan Washington think tank.

E-Verify allows employers to run a worker’s information againstHomeland Security and Social Security databases to check whether the person is permitted to work in the U.S. The Obama administration has made cracking down on employers who hire people here illegally a central part of its immigration enforcement policy, and there are expectations that some Republicans in Congress will try in coming weeks to make E-Verify mandatory.

E-Verify correctly identified legal workers 93 percent of the time, Westat said. However, previous studies have not quantified how many immigrants were fooling the E-Verify system. Much of the criticism of E-Verify has focused on whether U.S. citizens and legal immigrants with permission to work were falsely flagged as illegal workers.

More