Is Your Watch Worth More Than Your Life?

The family of a heart attack victim has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the emergency room doctor, hospital and hospital owners responsible for his care for wrongful death, conspiracy, negligent hiring and supervision.  The family alleges that the doctor purposely let his patient die in order to steal his Rolex watch.

While there is no mention of the vetting procedure the hospital followed with regards to the hiring of this doctor, I am sure this information is forthcoming.  Considering the level of responsibility that goes along with those who provide medical care to the sick and dying, anything short of a comprehensive background check is totally unacceptable.

St. Joseph’s Medical Center emergency room doctor steals Rolex leaves patient to die

Stockton, CA—A St. Joseph’s Medical Center emergency room doctor is under fire by the family of a retired Manteca police Lieutenant who died from a heart attack last June. The family alleges the doctor did not resuscitate their father so he could steal his Rolex. The adult children of the retired police official filed a wrongful death lawsuit last week, as reported by KTXL.

According to the lawsuit, Jerry Kubena Sr. was rushed to the St. Joseph’s Medical Center on June 1st for heart problems. Emergency room physician Dr. Cleveland Enmon allegedly allowed Kubena to die from a heart attack after he noticed his Presidential Rolex watch on his wrist. Two nurses reportedly noticed the watch was missing from the body of Mr. Kubena, and that a bulge appeared in the doctor’s pocket. The nurses reported the missing watch to security, who then told everyone to remain where they are. The lawsuit claims Dr. Enmons somehow slipped outside the hospital and walked into the parking lot, which was caught on the hospitals security cameras. A nurse decided to follow the doctor, and witnessed him throw something from his pocket into a grassy area in the parking lot. The nurse reportedly brought security to the area where she saw Dr. Enmom throw something, and recovered Mr. Kubena’s Rolex. Dr. Enmon was apparently confronted with the hospitals security footage, and was fired on the spot.

The civil lawsuit charges Dr. Cleveland Enmon, St. Josephs Medical Center, and hospital owners Catholic Healthcare West for wrongful death, conspiracy, negligent hiring, and supervision. The lawsuit also claims St. Joseph’s Medical Center tried to cover up the emergency room doctor’s crime after he was fired. Dr. Enmon was also reportedly indicted by a San Joaquin County grand jury last month for grand theft stemming from the death of Mr. Kubena.

Legal News Reporter: Nicole Howley-Legal news for California wrongful death lawyers.

You Commit Three Felonies a Day

What, Me Worry??

What, Me Worry??

Laws have become too vague and the concept of intent has disappeared.

This is a great article that was posted a few days ago in the online version of the Wall Street Journal.  This topic furthers the EEOC‘s case for making sure one doesn’t have a “bright-line” policy when rejecting job applicants with criminal records.  The EEOC and many State Laws want employers to demonstrate job relatedness, the nature of the offense, whether the candidate was a repeat offender and how long ago the crime was committed.  Reading this article one must ask themselves, “How many times have I broken the law today?”  Setting up consistent standards when doing employment background investigations is more important now than ever before.

You Commit Three Felonies a Day

When we think about the pace of change in technology, it’s usually to marvel at how computing power has become cheaper and faster or how many new digital ways we have to communicate. Unfortunately, this pace of change is increasingly clashing with some of the slower-moving parts of our culture.

Technology moves so quickly we can barely keep up, and our legal system moves so slowly it can’t keep up with itself. By design, the law is built up over time by court decisions, statutes and regulations. Sometimes even criminal laws are left vague, to be defined case by case. Technology exacerbates the problem of laws so open and vague that they are hard to abide by, to the point that we have all become potential criminals.

Boston civil-liberties lawyer Harvey Silverglate calls his new book “Three Felonies a Day,” referring to the number of crimes he estimates the average American now unwittingly commits because of vague laws. New technology adds its own complexity, making innocent activity potentially criminal.

More

EmployeeScreenIQ Podcast: This Week in Background Checks

Well it’s that time again to catch up on the latest background screening highlights from our blog and EmployeeScreen University.  Welcome to This Week in Background Checks (TWIB).  Let’s jump right in.

States Contemplate Early Release for Prisoners to Ease Spending- How this trend can have an impact on your background screening program.

Chester Ludow Earns His Master’s Degree– Should we be concerned that Chester is a dog?

Substandard Background Checks in Schools– Just what is a “fantastic” background check?  With the latest incident occurring in my own back yard, I couldn’t resist the opportunity to rant.

EmployeeScreenIQ Recognized as one of NE Ohio’s Fastest Growing Companies– Ouch!  Our arms are sore from patting ourselves on the back.

Podcast!!! E-Verify Mandate Finally in Place for Federal Contractors– No, the bad place down south has not frozen over and donkey’s are not flying!

Credit Scores and Background Checks– Why these things do not go together like peas and carrots.

Yale University Student Murdered– This is clearly a workplace violence issue.  Could a background check have prevented this?

For lowlights of these highlights, be sure to check out our podcast below.

As always, we’ll try to do better next time.

10/7/2009 RecruiterEarth Webinar

RecruiterEarth Online Webinar
[RecruiterEarth Online Webinar
(EmployeeScreenIQ Speaking Engagement) (http://recruiterearth.com/events/free-webinar-social)

Social Networking Sites: Can You Always Trust What You See?

Presented by Jason B. Morris, President and C.O.O. at EmployeeScreenIQ

October 7, 2009 at 2:00PM-3:00PM EST

Webinar

The social network revolution has changed many communication channels, but should it affect the way job applicants are screened? Sites such as Facebook, My Space and LinkedIn contain a wealth of personal information, but should you trust the information found on these sites? Does this practice pose a threat to possibly violating FCRA and EEOC guidelines and other best practices? Join EmployeeScreenIQ president and C.O.O., Jason B. Morris for this insightful presentation.

This session will help you understand the possible negative ramifications of using information from social networking sites in your employment screening processes.

#Interested in participating? [Sign up here.](http://recruiterearth.com/events/free-webinar-social)

EmployeeScreenIQ Webinar on RecruiterEarth

The folks from RecruiterEarth have asked us to conduct a webinar on the negative effects social networking sites can have on your background screening program.  EmployeeScreenIQ president and C.O.O. Jason B. Morris will present Social Networking Sites: Can You Always Trust What You See? via webinar at 4pm est on Wednesday, September 30, 2009.

Interested in attending?  Click here to register.

Checkout a brief description of the webinar below.

The social network revolution has changed many communication channels, but should it affect the way job applicants are screened? Sites such as Facebook, My Space and LinkedIn contain a wealth of personal information, but should you trust the information found on these sites? Does this practice pose a threat to possibly violating FCRA and EEOC guidelines and other best practices? Join EmployeeScreenIQ president and C.O.O., Jason B. Morris for this insightful presentation.

This session will help you understand the possible negative ramifications of using information from social networking sites in your employment screening processes.

Fake Diplomas: So Easy a Dog Could Do It

Diploma Dog

Diploma Dog

Getting a fake degree online from a diploma mill is so easy, even Chester the pug could do it.  No offense, Chester. The aforementioned pooch just received his MBA from Rochville University.    Check out the story below.  Some one might want to perform a background check with an Education Verification.

Unmuzzling Diploma Mills: Dog Earns M.B.A. Online

How’s this for “hounding” diploma mills?

GetEducated.com, an online-learning consumer group, managed to purchase an online M.B.A. for its mascot, a dog named Chester Ludlow.

The Vermont pug earned his tassles by pawing over $499 to Rochville University, which offers “distance learning degrees based on life and career experience,” according to a news release from GetEducated. He got back a package from a post-office box in Dubai that contained a diploma and transcripts, plus a certificate of distinction in finance and another purporting to show membership in the student council.

GetEducated.com belives Chester is the first dog to get a diploma for life experience. But his bow-wow M.B.A. isn’t the first canine college degree: Witness this 2007 story about a police-department dog’s diploma.

Here’s GetEducated.com’s video about the stunt: “Dog Earns Online MBA: A Cautionary Tail.”

Equifax Misquoted: Credit Reports Safe, We Think

We heard yesterday, but have not been able to confirm that Equifax was misquoted in an article written by Credit.com earlier this week.  The article said that Equifax decided to stop selling pre-employment credit reports.  It is our understanding that the following statement was meant to convey that they do not include credit scores on their credit reports (big news flash, not!), “Atlanta-based Equifax is no longer selling credit reports to employers for the purposes of pre-employment screening, according to Tim Klein, a company spokesperson who revealed the information in an interview with the Dallas Morning News.”

9/22/2009 Paulding County Georgia Court Closed

Paulding County, GA County Court Closed

September 22-??, 2009

Closed Due to Flooding

We have received word that the Paulding County courts will be closed until further notice due to severe flooding in the Atlanta area. It is unknown how long the court will be closed. We will provide updates as soon as we know more.

Please expect delays on searches requested in this jurisdiction.

Equifax Says No More Employment Credit Reports

Using Equifax for your employment credit reports or a background screening provider that resells Equifax’s data?  Not anymore.  Equifax has announced that they will no longer offer employment credit reports directly or through their channel partners.  The use of credit reports for background screening purposes has been a hot button issue for some time now and emotions on their use have only intensified since the economy went south.  Why?  Because more people have bad credit these days and opponents of this practice are concerned that these people missing out on jobs they would otherwise be qualified for.

Employment Credit Reports do serve an important role in determining whether candidates qualify for specific positions.  They help employers mitigate risk to their business and their customers.

We hope that the other two credit bureaus, Experian and TransUnion are not prepared to follow suit.

See story below from Credit.com:

09.22.09
By John Ulzheimer

Atlanta-based Equifax is no longer selling credit reports to employers for the purposes of pre-employment screening, according to Tim Klein, a company spokesperson who revealed the information in an interview with the Dallas Morning News. The credit reports sold by Equifax into the employment market, formerly known as “Persona”, were used to determine employment eligibility. And while this is still perfectly legal under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the company seems to have proactively decided that selling reports to employers wasn’t worth the trouble.

Long a public relations loser, the use of credit reports by employers has become even more controversial given the current economy and the added difficulty that poor credit causes a job seeker who is already having trouble finding a job. Employers who are filling positions where access to money and sensitive information are commonplace have traditionally reviewed credit reports as part of their pre-employment screening processes. The practice is important, as the number of internal data breaches has increased over the past decade. Weeding out an applicant with troubled credit is a responsible act by any such employer.

The trouble with the practice is that it can be unfair to some consumers who have found themselves thrown into credit difficulty through no fault of their own. Layoffs, divorce, uncovered medical expenses, business failures, and death in the earning family can all cause a consumer’s credit reports to become littered with negative information despite no lack of credit management responsibility. And some argue that using credit reports as a screening tool can be unfair to minorities, a claim that lacks any scientific support at this time.

Credit scores, a risk prediction tool used by most lenders and insurance companies, are not provided to employers by either of the two companies that are still selling credit reports for employment purposes, TransUnion and Experian. Credit scores are not designed to predict employee quality or employee performance, so their use for employment screening would be inappropriate. The topic of credit scores and employment continues to be confusing given the amount of incorrect coverage of the issue.

So the next time you’re looking for a job and the job entails you standing in front of a cash drawer, you can still assume that your credit report will be pulled as part of the screening process. It just won’t come from Equifax. And it still won’t have your credit score.

Nursing home employee charged with stealing from residents

A Georgia woman has been accused of stealing from residents of the nursing home that she worked at.  Coastal Manor Long Term Care Facility said they conducted a comprehensive background check on the woman.  Nursing homes are required to conduct background checks in many states and apparently the problem of abuse in nursing homes is so prevalent that it has its own blog, Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog. The fact that this blog exists at all should convince any nursing home that is not currently conducting background checks the need to start ASAP!

Woman accused of stealing at nursing home

 LUDOWICI  — An employee of Coastal Manor Long Term Care Facility was arrested Friday and has been charged with stealing from the nursing home and several of its residents.
According to Ludowici Police Department Investigator Sal Genualdi, Demetria Denise Williams was arrested after Elise Stafford, the home’s chief long-term care officer, reported the center had information showing an employee had been stealing.
After gathering information from Stafford, Genualdi went to Coastal Manor and arrested Williams, 28, a military spouse who lives on Governor’s Boulevard in Hinesville.  
Genualdi said Williams was then taken to the LPD, where she was charged with theft by deception, theft by taking and exploitation of the elderly.
Genualdi said Williams has been charged with stealing more than $4,000 and that he anticipates as many as 25 more theft warrants.
Genualdi alleged Williams stole from residents by taking money for their families, but not depositing it into appropriate accounts.
Stafford said Williams also stole from the facility by taking payment of services not provided to residents.
“The majority of the money that was stolen was from payment for services,” Stafford said. “There was a minimal amount taken from the residents.”
She said she has reported the alleged crimes to state regulators and has asked for an independent auditor to look at the incident.
Genualdi said the initial charges all related to thefts from individuals, not from the home, which operates under auspices of Liberty Regional Medical Center in Hinesville.
Stafford said job applicants go through criminal back ground checks and that nothing was found on Williams to have prevented her from being hired.
“Our goal is to provide good quality care for our residents, and to protect them from any type of abuse,” Stafford said.
Genualdi said a $5,000 bond was set for Williams, but as of Thursday, she was still in the Wayne County Jail.