SterlingBackcheck Acquires EmployeeScreenIQ, a Global Provider of Background Screening Services

NEW YORK, November 3, 2015 – SterlingBackcheck, one of the world’s largest background screening companies, announced today that it has acquired EmployeeScreenIQ, a global provider of employment background checks and substance abuse screening services. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

EmployeeScreenIQ Joins SterlingBackcheck, One of the World’s Largest Screening Companies

EmployeeScreen_logo_SBCompany

We’re pleased to announce that we have joined SterlingBackcheck, one of the world’s leading background screening companies.

EmployeeScreenIQ and SterlingBackcheck are already united by the desire to provide the highest quality background check services.  By combining their strong customer-driven cultures with sophisticated technologies, SterlingBackcheck and EmployeeScreenIQ can better serve customers around the world with comprehensive screening solutions and services for both pre-hire and post-hire needs.

In the short term, nothing changes. Daily interactions with EmployeeScreenIQ will continue as usual:

  • The processes for completing consent forms, ordering background checks and viewing results will not change.
  • Our sales, operations, and client service teams will stay in place and continue to serve you.
  • Our current management team, including Jason Morris and Nick Fishman remains in Cleveland.

As we start to bring SterlingBackcheck and EmployeeScreenIQ together, you will see a clear focus on delivering new and innovative resources, all with the aim of helping organizations achieve their screening goals more effectively. We anticipate the combined offerings of EmployeeScreenIQ and SterlingBackcheck will create new opportunities for all of us to explore together.

Read the press release.

NYC Fair Chance Act: 6 Ways Employers Can Stay Compliant

The New York City Fair Chance Act went into effect on October 27. The Act addresses employers’ responsibilities as they relate to criminal background checks. The law is designed to delay criminal background screening to allow candidates an opportunity to interview and be considered for jobs before potential elimination by a background check.

Under the Fair Chance Act, New York City employers are prohibited from inquiring or obtaining any statement about an applicant’s criminal background until after a conditional offer of employment has been made.

Check out our latest video to learn six ways employers can stay compliant with the new law.

New York City Fair Chance Act Buries Employers with More Paperwork

shutterstock_310730585

You know that feeling when you get to deliver what you know is going to be very unpopular news to a group of people and you have to present it as a positive? Well, get ready those of you conducting employment background checks in New York City, because I’m about to blow your mind with . . .  wait for it. MORE PAPERWORK!!!!!!

As you all know by now, New York City passed the Fair Chance Act on September 3, 2015 which addresses employers’ responsibilities as they relate to criminal background checks. The law, set to take effect on Tuesday, October 27, 2015, is designed to delay criminal background screening to allow candidates an opportunity to interview and be considered for jobs before potential elimination by a background check. Under the Fair Chance Act, New York City employers are prohibited from inquiring or obtaining any statement about an applicant’s criminal background until after a conditional offer of employment has been made.  For purposes of the Act, “any statement” means a statement communicated in writing or otherwise to the applicant for purposes of obtaining criminal background information regarding: (i) an arrest record; (ii) a conviction record; or (iii) a criminal background check.

While we’ve outlined the parameters of this law in previous blog posts, there was one provision that was a little unclear until now.

  • Before an employer takes adverse action (e.g. rescind a job offer), the employer is obligated to provide the applicant with: (1) a copy of the New York Corrections Law, Article 23-A; (2) a copy of the document on which the decision was based (the consumer report); and (3) a copy of the employer’s written analysis conducted to make this determination.
  • The written analysis should include the decision maker’s consideration of the factors listed in Article 23-A and its determination as to whether the criminal history is directly related to the position sought or otherwise poses an unreasonable risk as delineated in 23-A.

Introducing the Fair Chance Act Notice

On Friday, the New York City Commission on Human Rights (NYCCHR) distributed the Fair Chance Act Notice form which must be completed and sent to the candidate before taking any adverse action.

Fair Chance Act

It is important to recognize that these responsibilities are requirements regardless of whether you conduct the background check in house or if you outsource to a background screening company. Further, you must adhere to these requirements regardless of whether you intend to employ the individual in New York City or not. If the candidate currently resides in New York City, then these requirements must be followed.

For a complete list of the New York City Fair Chance Act requirements, see below:

  • After (and only after) a conditional offer has been made, an employer can obtain consent (authorization and disclosure) to run a criminal background check (obtain a “consumer report”).
  • After running the background check, if the employer conducts an analysis and adverse action is warranted under New York Corrections Law 23-A, the employer can proceed with taking adverse action based on the information.
  • Before an employer takes adverse action (e.g. rescind a job offer), the employer is obligated to provide the applicant with: (1) a copy of the New York Corrections Law, Article 23-A; (2) a copy of the document on which the decision was based (the consumer report); and (3) a copy of the employer’s written analysis conducted to make this determination.
  • The written analysis should include the decision maker’s consideration of the factors listed in Article 23-A and its determination as to whether the criminal history is directly related to the position sought or otherwise poses an unreasonable risk as delineated in 23-A.
  • The employer must then hold the job opportunity open for a reasonable amount of time, but not less than three business days, so that the applicant can respond with additional or mitigating information.
  • If a criminal record is discovered or disclosed post conditional hire and the employer learns through a background check that the candidate failed to disclose a conviction, the employer must follow the Fair Chance Act process and give the candidate a copy of the background check and notice of intent to take adverse action even if the reason for the adverse action is dishonesty/failure to disclose.

Our friends at Seyfarth Shaw also published a helpful guide for what employers can do to get in compliance.

Good luck with your new found work and please, please, please don’t shoot the messenger.

EmployeeScreenIQ Employee Spotlight: Danielle Gilchrist

 

Danielle G Spotlight

At EmployeeScreenIQ, we view our employees as our biggest strength. Each month we’ll be spending time with a different employee to highlight their excellence and learn about them and what they do here at EmployeeScreenIQ.

This month, we’re featuring Danielle Gilchrist, Manager, Enterprise Client Group. Danielle is responsible for managing premier client relationships and ensuring the background check programs are in line with client expectations. Danielle has been working at EmployeeScreenIQ for 9 years.

A resounding message from co-workers and clients is everyone considers Danielle dedicated to her role and always there to help.

Allyson E., human resources compliance administrator at Hospice Compassus said, “I appreciate the dedication Danielle has to our account. I am very comforted to know that she is there for answers and support. She is truly a joy to work with daily.”

Get to know Danielle…

How did you first learn about EmployeeScreenIQ?
I knew our EVP from a previous job. He told me about EmployeeScreenIQ and I said, “Sign me up!”

What aspect of your role do you enjoy the most?
I enjoy getting to know our clients and what is important to them in a screening program, educating them on trends in the industry and being a partner that they can trust and feel comfortable working with.

What is your favorite part about working at EmployeeScreenIQ?
The people! We have a great team here in the building, we are all passionate about what we do and are basically one big happy family!

What is one thing you couldn’t live without?
Chocolate. There have been times where I race my boss to the vending machine to get the last candy bar.

What kinds of hobbies and interests do you have outside of work?
I spend a lot of time with my family, I always enjoy baking delicious treats for my co-workers. I like participating in hot yoga classes, going to concerts and visiting animal shelters…all sorts of stuff!

What is your favorite movie and book?
Movie: The Lion King
Book: For One More Day by Mitch Albom

What’s on your iPod?
Mostly classic rock and some 80s

What is the first concert you attended?
The Beach Boys

What is the first thing you would buy if you won the lottery?
I would build my mom her dream house.

Favorite place in Cleveland?
I would have to go with the zoo.

Many Employers Not in Compliance With EEOC Criminal Records Guidance, EmployeeScreenIQ Research Shows

CLEVELAND, Oct. 21, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — When the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s criminal records guidance was made stricter in 2012, employers reacted with concern and confusion. A survey released this year by EmployeeScreenIQ showed that while more employers are following the EEOC guidance, many still admit to being out of compliance — a situation that puts them at considerable legal risk.

Federal Ban the Box Bill Introduced in Both Houses of Congress

Banthebox

This post is courtesy of the National Association of Professional Background Screeners’ (NAPBS) Government Relations Committee.

“Ban the box” legislation has been introduced for the first time at the federal level, reflecting a broader trend witnessed in dozens of states and municipalities.  On September 10, a bi-partisan group of lawmakers in both houses of Congress introduced the Fair Chance Act (S. 2021  / H.R. 3470), which would prohibit federal agencies or contractors from asking prospective employees about whether they have a criminal record before a formal job offer has been extended.  Once a conditional offer of employment has been made, an employer would be permitted to ask about the applicant’s criminal record and revoke the offer based on the results of a criminal background check.

The proposed law includes exceptions for “sensitive positions,” including law enforcement, national security, and positions with access to classified information. Protection is provided in the bill for whistleblowers who report coworkers for not following the law, and penalties range from a warning for a first violation to suspensions of increasing length, up to a $1,000 fine for subsequent violations.

The Fair Chance Act was introduced by Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Representative Elijah Cummings (D-MD).  Co-sponsors of the bill are Senators Ron Johnson (R-WI); Tammy Baldwin (D-WI); Sherrod Brown (D-OH); and Joni Ernst (R-IA); Representatives Darrell Issa (R-CA); Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX); Earl Blumenauer (D-OR); Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-NJ) Cedric Richmond (D-LA); John Conyers (D-MI), and Bobby Scott (D-VA).

The lawmakers supporting the bill said that as many as 70 million people with criminal histories may face barriers to employment and highlighted that 18 states and more than 100 local entities have already enacted similar measures, with private employers following suit by adopting internal company policies to ban the box.

The Fair Chance Act is currently pending in committee in both chambers, and will be the subject of a hearing on October 7 in the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee.

To read the Fair Chance Act please (S. 2021 / H.R. 3470).

The EEOC’s Criminal Background Screening Guidance 3 Years Later

Capture

By definition, guidance is supposed to help resolve a problem. Yet, for employers, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) 2012 update to its criminal background screening guidance has instead created a problem: uncertainty about how to conduct criminal background checks without significant legal risk.

GE Doesn’t Need TV Commercials, It Needs a Visionary

GE Jobs

Blame it on Steve Jobs.

Have you seen the latest recruitment TV commercials by mega-company GE? (Don’t call ’em General Electric.)

Now, I’m not here to hate on the commercials, or even the strategy to use traditional channels to market job opportunities and change candidate attitudes. Attracting top engineering talent is no easy task. I even applaud the effort. I’m even confident it’ll attract a good number of engineers. The best engineers? That’s debatable.

The company, however, would fare much better if it had a visionary leader that connected with the digerati they desire to desperately. Do you know the CEO of GE? Me neither. CFO? Nope. Founder? Nah. Do they have a developer conference like Facebook’s F8? No clue.

The Cult of Personality, similar to the one Apple’s Steve Jobs oozed, is now a 24/7 offering. And we all – including job candidates and employees alike – have an insatiable appetite.

So it’s no surprise Twitter cofounder Jack Dorsey was remade the company’s CEO this week after years of floundering and a nosediving stock price. The company has been bleeding talent for months, and Dorsey’s greatest value may be his ability to come back and boomerang former employees and inspire new ones to come on board.

Why? Because Dorsey is a visionary. The list of successful companies with such men and women is long. Larry Page. Mark Zuckerberg. Aaron Levie. Jeff Bezos. Marissa Mayer. Howard Schultz. Elon Musk. Sheryl Sandberg. And on and on.

Top talent wants to work for such visionary leadership. People want to be led. People want to be inspired. People want to work with the best. And they want to be part of something bigger than themselves.

Employers with visionaries keep their employees. They attract new ones. Any old and crusty company looking to improve its recruitment efforts should take note. And if they can’t make them CEO, find some other way to bring them to the table. Snapchat making former Apple executive Scott Forstall an advisor is one such strategy.

Hey, maybe Forstall should be GE’s new CTO. Now that’s a recruitment strategy.